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Latest Quantum measurement Stories

New Theory May Help Explain Why Nature Is Quantum
2013-05-14 12:41:52

Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore Like small children, scientists are always asking the question 'why?'. One question they've yet to answer is why nature picked quantum physics, in all its weird glory, as a sensible way to behave. Researchers Corsin Pfister and Stephanie Wehner at the Centre for Quantum Technologies at the National University of Singapore tackle this perennial question in a paper published 14 May in Nature Communications. We know...

2013-04-23 14:32:52

An international team of scientists has shed new light on a fundamental area of physics which could have important implications for future electronic devices and the transfer of information at the quantum level. The electrical currents currently used to power electronic devices are generated by a flow of charges. However, emerging quantum technologies such as spin-electronics, make use of both charge and another intrinsic property of electrons — their spin — to transfer and...

No More Loopholes For Photons
2013-04-15 14:53:36

University of Vienna A team led by the Austrian physicist Anton Zeilinger has now carried out an experiment with photons, in which they have closed an important loophole. The researchers have thus provided the most complete experimental proof that the quantum world is in conflict with our everyday experience. The results of this study appear this week in the renowned journal Nature (Advance Online Publication/AOP). When we observe an object, we make a number of intuitive assumptions,...

Einstein's "Spooky Action" Theory Could Be Tested Aboard Space Station
2013-04-10 12:02:29

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online "Spooky action at a distance" is how Albert Einstein rather famously described the theory of quantum entanglement. Until now, however, experiments attempting to examine this peculiar quantum mechanical phenomenon have been limited to relatively small distances on Earth. Researchers have proposed a solution to this in a new study published in the New Journal of Physics. To test the limits of Einstein's "spooky action" and potentially...

2013-03-18 20:52:23

Weizmann Institute researchers suggest one can affect an atom´s spin by adjusting the way it is measured One of the most basic laws of quantum mechanics is that a system can be in more than one state — it can exist in multiple realities — at once. This phenomenon, known as the superposition principle, exists only so long as the system is not observed or measured in any way. As soon as such a system is measured, its superposition collapses into a single state. Thus, we, who...

2013-03-13 17:57:30

A University of Southampton academic has received a major research grant to help him explore the limitations of quantum theory. Dr Hendrik Ulbricht, a Reader in Physics and Astronomy, has been awarded nearly £500,000 by the John Templeton Foundation in the US. Sir John Templeton, the late American millionaire, investor and philanthropist, created the Foundation to encourage scientists and students across the globe to explore fundamental, big questions in astronomy and cosmology...

2013-03-04 13:22:04

Physicists make first direct measurements of polarization states of light Researchers at the University of Rochester and the University of Ottawa have applied a recently developed technique to directly measure for the first time the polarization states of light. Their work both overcomes some important challenges of Heisenberg's famous Uncertainty Principle and also is applicable to qubits, the building blocks of quantum information theory. They report their results in a paper published...

Playing Quantum Tricks By Reversing Measurements
2013-02-15 14:02:48

University of Innsbruck A team of physicists at the University of Innsbruck, Austria, performed an experiment that seems to contradict the foundations of quantum theory — at first glance. The team led by Rainer Blatt reversed a quantum measurement in a prototype quantum information processor. The experiment is enabled by a technique that has been developed for quantum error correction in a future quantum computer. Measurements on quantum systems have puzzled generations of...

2013-02-06 10:01:30

Ever since Austrian scientist Erwin Schrodinger put his unfortunate cat in a box, his fellow physicists have been using something called quantum theory to explain and understand the nature of waves and particles. But a new paper by physics professor Andreas Albrecht and graduate student Dan Phillips at the University of California, Davis, makes the case that these quantum fluctuations actually are responsible for the probability of all actions, with far-reaching implications for theories...

Quantum Object Behavior Depends On Measurement Apparatus Used
2013-01-09 14:54:07

University of Vienna Whether a quantum object behaves like a wave or like a particle depends (according to the Copenhagen interpretation) on the choice of measurement apparatus used for observing the system, and therefore on the type of measurement performed. Anton Zeilinger's team of physicists at the University of Vienna and the Austrian Academy of Sciences has recently taken this phenomenon further than ever. Whether a certain photon behaves like a particle or like a wave depends on...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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