Quantcast

Latest Quaternary Stories

Insects Offer Clues To Ancient Climate Variability 10,000
2011-11-15 11:55:51

An analysis of the remains of ancient midges — tiny non-biting insects closely related to mosquitoes — opens a new window on the past with a detailed view of the surprising regional variability that accompanied climate warming during the early Holocene epoch, 10,000 to 5,500 years ago. Researchers at the University of Illinois and the University of British Columbia looked at the abundance and variety of midge larvae buried in lake sediments in Alaska. Midges are highly...

2011-06-01 08:24:00

MILWAUKEE, June 1, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The Economist, a globally-recognized international affairs magazine, has reported that scientists and academics are increasingly reaching a consensus that the impact of human activity has so dramatically shaped the Earth as to herald a new geological age. The power of human potential was also identified by ManpowerGroup (NYSE: MAN), the world leader in innovative workforce solutions, earlier this year as being behind the dawn of the Human Age, where...

5fa07c7a948e5971ce2f969856c71309
2011-02-02 22:26:36

Human influence on the landscape, global warming, sea level rise, ocean acidification and biodiversity are highlighted in a new set of studies led by University of Leicester researchers.How this influence will be reflected in the distinctive geological record forms the basis of the studies published in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A.Jan Zalasiewicz and Mark Williams from the University of Leicester Department of Geology led the production of the studies into the...

2010-06-11 13:41:40

Research at the School of Geographical Sciences, Southwest University (SWU) in Chongqing, China-Research, has demonstrated that the record of the Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) covers the last deglaciation and the early Holocene (from 16.2 to 7.3 ka BP), with an average oxygen isotope resolution of 9 years (issue 53, May 2010 of SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences). Understanding the factors responsible for past climatic changes is a key to understand future climate change. Such climatic changes include...

a2ee944b524fce43f0079a797924e8141
2010-05-24 07:04:06

The balance of biodiversity within North American small-mammal communities is so out of whack from the last episode of global warming about 12,000 years ago that the current climate change could push them past a tipping point, with repercussions up and down the food chain, say Stanford biologists. The evidence lies in fossils spanning the last 20,000 years that the researchers excavated from a cave in Northern California. What they found is that although the small mammals in the area suffered...

885d5b8a09523b9487e82133891cbe561
2010-05-24 06:16:30

The extinction of mammoths and other megafauna that came after humans spread out across the New World may be one explanation of a sharp decline in global temperatures more than 12,750 years ago, researchers reported on Sunday. Roughly a hundred species of grass-eating giants that once flourished on the North American landscape released massive quantities of methane during their lifetime. As a heat-trapping greenhouse gas, methane is 30 times more potent than carbon dioxide. It may not have...

47c33debeee7e8874e556e24be970bc01
2010-04-14 13:13:04

In just two centuries, humans have wrought such vast and unprecedented changes to our world that we actually might be ushering in a new geological time period that could alter the planet for millions of years, according to a group of prominent scientists that includes a Nobel Laureate. They say the dawning of this new epoch could lead to the sixth largest mass extinction in the Earth's history. Their commentary appears in ACS' bi-weekly journal Environmental Science & Technology. Jan...

1eff27ee5c7aee29a632b1a6c1401b211
2010-03-27 11:21:23

Researchers show how world has changed Geologists from the University of Leicester are among four scientists- including a Nobel prize-winner "“ who suggest that the Earth has entered a new age of geological time. The Age of Aquarius? Not quite - It's the Anthropocene Epoch, say the scientists writing in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. (web issue March 29; print issue April 1) And they add that the dawning of this new epoch may include the sixth largest mass...

2009-09-22 09:28:15

After decades of debate and four years of investigation an international body of earth scientists has formally agreed to move the boundary dates for the prehistoric Quaternary age by 800,000 years, reports the Journal of Quaternary Science. The decision has been made by the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS), the authority for geological science which has acted to end decades of controversy by formally declaring when the Quaternary Period, which covers both the ice age and moment...

2009-06-03 10:05:00

In 1996, an international team of scientists led by the University of Zaragoza (UNIZAR) started to carry out a paleontological survey in the cave of El Mir³n. Since then they have focused on analysing the fossil remains of the bones and teeth of small vertebrates that lived in the Cantabrian region over the past 41,000 years, at the end of the Quaternary. The richness, great diversity and good conservation status of the fossils have enabled the researchers to carry out a paleoclimatic...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.