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Latest Radio telescopes Stories

ALMA Workers Strike
2013-08-23 12:34:07

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Despite its remoteness and unique scientific work environment, the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observatory is not immune to the disputes between workers and management that affect every other industry. On Thursday, almost 200 workers went on strike over compensation that they say is inadequate considering the unusual demands of working in a remote, high-altitude location. The telescopic array is located in...

Western Australian State Government Invests $26M In Astronomy And The Square Kilometre Array
2013-08-16 17:13:42

ICRAR The International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), based in Perth, Western Australia has been extended for another five years thanks to a $26M investment announced by WA Premier Colin Barnett today. The $26M from the Western Australian State Government will allow ICRAR’s local activities in science and with industry to continue, but will also expand the high tech and scientific capabilities of the State. A joint venture between Curtin University and The University of...

First Foundation Poured For MeerKAT Antenna
2013-08-15 09:45:00

Square Kilometre Array (SKA) Africa Each of MeerKAT's 64 antennas will stand firmly on a bed of concrete and steel The concrete for the first MeerKAT antenna foundation was poured yesterday (Wednesday 14 August 2013) at South Africa's SKA site in the Karoo. This is the first of 64 similar foundations that will be constructed for this telescope over the next nine months. Each foundation consists of 78 m³ concrete and 9 tons of steel. "Designing a foundation for a high-tech telescope...

2013-08-08 09:09:21

South Africa's SKA Project (SKA SA) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in the US have agreed to continue their collaboration across a broad front to advance cutting-edge radio astronomy projects in both countries over the next five years. An agreement signed in Cape Town on 5 August 2013 paves the way for the organizations to pool resources and expertise in high-level projects related to the development and implementation of software, data processing and archiving and...

Age Of Astronomy Big Data Is Already Here
2013-07-23 09:11:39

ICRAR High-performance computing specialists from Perth's International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR) today became the first users of one of Australia's leading supercomputing facilities -- the Pawsey Centre -- ahead of its official opening later this year. The recent launch of the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) -- a radio telescope based in Western Australia's Mid West -- marked the start of an impressive flow of astronomical data that will be stored in the iVEC-managed...

Seeing The Early Universe In A New Way
2013-07-10 11:57:08

ICRAR Solar storms, space junk and the formation of the Universe are about to be seen in an entirely new way with the start of operations today by the $51 million Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) radio telescope. The first of three international precursors to the $2 billion Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope, the MWA is located in a remote pocket of outback Western Australia. It is the result of an international project led by Curtin University and was officially turned on this...

2013-06-14 23:00:44

Arecibo Observatory catches the most detailed radar images ever of asteroid 1998 QE2 and its newly-discovered moon as they safely pass our planet. Arecibo, Puerto Rico (PRWEB) June 14, 2013 Arecibo Observatory continues to take radar images of asteroid 1998 QE2 and its moon as the space rock sails safely passed earth this week. The images show a dark cratered asteroid 3 kilometers across (1.9 miles) with a companion moon 750 meters (2,500 feet) in size. The asteroid and its moon passed 6...

How Does Hydrogen Drive Star Formation In Galaxies
2013-06-13 05:00:58

John P. Millis, Ph.D. for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online A major field of study in astronomy seeks to understand how galaxies form and evolve. One advantage that we possess is that as we study the light from the most distant galaxies, we are effectively looking back in time, seeing the oldest galaxies in the Universe when they were still young. But there is a problem: the farther away the galaxies are, the more difficult they are to study. This is the issue faced by...

Galaxies Discovered Buried In Dust
2013-06-01 05:33:58

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Approximately 80 percent of all unidentifiable millimeter wave signals emitted in the universe actually originate from galaxies, according to new research published in Saturday´s edition of the Astrophysical Journal Letters. Based on observations collected using Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) telescopes, professor Kouji Ohta and postdoctoral researcher Bunyo Hatsukade of Kyoto University in Japan and...


Latest Radio telescopes Reference Libraries

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2004-10-19 04:45:43

Very Large Array -- The Very Large Array, one of the world's premier astronomical radio observatories, consists of 27 radio antennas in a Y-shaped configuration on the Plains of San Agustin fifty miles west of Socorro, New Mexico. Each antenna is 25 meters (82 feet) in diameter. The data from the antennas is combined electronically to give the resolution of an antenna 36km (22 miles) across, with the sensitivity of a dish 130 meters (422 feet) in diameter. The VLA is an...

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2004-10-19 04:45:43

Radio Telescope -- In contrast to an ordinary telescope, which produces visible light images, a radio telescope "sees" radio waves emitted by radio sources located anywhere in the Universe, typically by means of a large parabolic ("dish") antenna, or arrays of them. The best-known (and largest) radio telescope is in Arecibo, Puerto Rico. A well-known radio telescope being an array of antennae is the Very Large Array (VLA) in Socorro, New Mexico. The largest (100-meter diameter) and most...

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2004-10-19 04:45:43

Radio Astronomy -- Radio astronomy is the study of celestial phenomena through measurement of the characteristics of radio waves emitted by physical processes occurring in space. Radio waves are much longer than light waves. In order to receive good signals, radio astronomy requires large antennas. Radio astronomy is a relatively new field of astronomical research. The earliest investigations into extraterrestrial sources of radio waves were by Karl Guthe Jansky, an engineer with Bell...

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2004-10-19 04:45:40

National Radio Astronomy Observatory -- The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) is a research facility of the U.S. National Science Foundation. They provide state-of-the-art radio telescope facilities for use by the scientific community. They conceive, design, build, operate and maintain radio telescopes used by scientists from around the world. Scientists use their facilities to study virtually all types of astronomical objects known, from planets and comets in our own Solar...

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2004-10-19 04:45:40

Jodrell Bank Observatory -- The Jodrell Bank Observatory, near Macclesfield, Cheshire in the north west of England is a part of the University of Manchester. It has played an important part in the research into quasars and pulsars, as well as the first detection of a gravitational lens in 1979, confirming one of Einstein's theories. It was established in 1945 by Dr. Bernard Lovell, who wanted to investigate cosmic rays after his work on radar in World War II. The first radio...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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