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Latest Rapid eye movement sleep Stories

Image 1 - So That's What Dreams Are Made Of
2011-10-28 10:54:01

Scientists measure dream content for the first time and find that dreams activate the brain in a similar way to real actions. The ability to dream is a fascinating aspect of the human mind. However, how the images and emotions that we experience so intensively when we dream form in our heads remains a mystery. Up to now it has not been possible to measure dream content. Max Planck scientists working with colleagues from the Charité hospital in Berlin have now succeeded, for...

Poor Sleep Quality Can Affect Blood Pressure
2011-08-30 08:24:38

  A new study has found that older men who suffer from a lack of deep sleep are nearly twice as likely to have high blood pressure (HBP), reports BBC News. The new research, published in Hypertension: Journal of the American Heart Association, suggests that reduced slow wave sleep (SWS) is a powerful predictor for developing the condition that causes deadly heart attack, stroke and other health problems. SWS, a deep stage of sleep, is characterized by non-rapid eye movement...

2011-08-16 12:21:37

    * Alcohol is known to increase slow-wave sleep during the first half of sleep, but then become disruptive.    * A new study of the relationship between sleep and heart rate variability (HRV) during sleep has found that alcohol interferes with the restorative functions of sleep. Large amounts of alcohol are known to shorten sleep latency, increase slow-wave sleep, and suppress rapid eye movement (REM) during the first half of sleep. During the second half of...

2011-07-25 23:37:36

With the novel use of a technique that uses light to control brain cells, Stanford University researchers have shown that fragmented sleep causes memory impairment in mice. Until recently scientists have been unable to tease out the effects on the brain of different yet intertwined features of sleep. But these investigators were able to overcome that problem and come to their findings by using the novel method, known as optogenetics, to manipulate brain cells to affect just one aspect of...

2011-07-21 12:25:31

The optgenetical engineering technology controls the activity of orexin neurons of the brain Recently, optogenetics, which controls the activity of neuron using the light-activated protein, has been getting a lot of attention. This light-activated protein works like a switch of neurons by sensing specific color of light. This time, Associate Professor Akihiro YAMANAKA and Dr. Tomomi Tsunematsu from National Institute for Physiological Sciences (NIPS), succeeded in suppressing only the...

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2011-06-21 05:50:00

Napping on a slowly swinging bed helps us to both fall asleep faster and encourages a deeper sleep than stationary beds, according to findings published in the June 21 issue of Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. "It is a common belief that rocking induces sleep: we irresistibly fall asleep in a rocking chair and, since immemorial times, we cradle our babies to sleep," says one of the study's co-authors, Sophie Schwartz of the University of Geneva. "The goal of our study was twofold,"...

2011-06-13 14:43:34

Study finds that treatment with frontal cerebral thermal transfer can eliminate insomnia symptoms People with primary insomnia may be able to find relief by wearing a cap that cools the brain during sleep, suggests a research abstract that will be presented Monday, June 13, in Minneapolis, Minn., at SLEEP 2011, the 25th Anniversary Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC (APSS). According to the authors, a reduction in metabolism in the brain's frontal cortex occurs while...

2011-05-15 11:30:00

HONOLULU, May 15, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- A study presented today at the American Psychiatric Association's annual meeting suggests that sleep disturbances like obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), excessive awakening and insomnia, may be a normal result of combat experience, rather than a symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), major depression or other psychiatric conditions. The retrospective study, which will be published this summer as "Sleep...

2011-04-27 11:40:25

New research finds that consistent, "signature" brainwave patterns first noticed in short-term studies of adults are so robust that they're also detectable over a matter of years in the notoriously turbulent brains of teens. From there, the question is what such a "neural fingerprint" might mean. Teens are rarely described as stable, so when something about their rapidly changing brains remains placidly unaltered, neuroscientists take notice. Such is the case in a new study of...

2011-03-28 17:31:51

During a large-scale study of the socioeconomic costs of this neurodegenerative disease, Danish researchers, some from the University of Copenhagen, discovered that very early symptoms of Parkinson's disease may be revealed in dream or REM sleep. Parkinson's disease is a brain disease best known for the trembling it causes. It is an incurable, chronic disease and gradually affects the muscles and mental capacity, seriously afflicting the lives if the patient and his or her immediate...


Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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