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Tinamou
2006-10-19 13:28:36

The tinamous are one of the most ancient groups of bird, members of a South American bird family of about 47 species in 9 genera. Although they look similar to other ground-dwelling birds like quail and grouse, they have no close relatives and are classified as a single family. The tinamous range is from South America and north to Mexico. They occur in a wide range of habitats. Tinamous are...

Rhea
2006-10-19 13:26:41

The Rhea is a large flightless bird native to South America. American Rheas live in grassland, savanna, scrub forest, chaparral, and even desert, but prefer areas with at least some tall vegetation. Darwin's Rhea lives in areas of open scrub in the grasslands of Patagonia and on the Andean plateau. It is classified as endangered throughout its range. The Common Rhea, Rhea americana, is not...

Kiwi
2006-10-19 13:24:18

A kiwi is any of the species of small flightless birds endemic to New Zealand of the genus Apteryx (the only genus in family Apterygidae). There are currently six recognized species of kiwi: Great Spotted Kiwi, Apteryx haastii, distributed through the more mountainous parts of northwest Nelson, the northern West Coast, and the Southern Alps. Little Spotted Kiwi, Apteryx owenii, on Kapiti...

Cassowaries
2006-10-19 13:20:44

Cassowaries, Casuarius, are very large flightless birds native to the tropical forests of New Guinea and northeastern Australia. Cassowaries are part of the ratite group of birds that include the emu, rhea, ostrich, moa, and kiwi. There are three species of Cassowary recognized today: The Southern Cassowary of Australia and New Guinea; the Dwarf Cassowary of New Guinea and New Britain; and the...

Emu
2006-09-25 15:26:54

The Emu, Dromaius novaehollandiae, is the largest bird native to Australia and the only existing member of the genus Dromaius. It is also the second largest bird in the world by height, after the ostrich. The Emu is common over most of mainland Australia, although it avoids heavily populated areas, dense forest and arid areas. There are three existing subspecies in Australia: In the...

Ostrich
2006-09-25 15:21:14

The Ostrich, Struthio camelus, is a flightless bird native to Africa. It is the only living species of its family, Struthionidae. Ostriches occur naturally on the savannas and Sahel of Africa, both north and south of the equatorial forest zone. Other members of this group include rheas, emus, cassowaries and the largest bird ever, the now-extinct Aepyornis. Six subspecies are recognized:...

Elegant Crested Tinamou
2006-09-25 14:51:38

The Elegant Crested Tinamou, Eudromia elegans, is a medium-sized, up to 16.2 inches long, partridge-like bird found in the grassland and savanna of Chile and Argentina. This bird is dark or yellowish brown with a short tail and wings. There are two white stripes on the side of the face. There is a long crest with pointed upward tip. The feet have no hind toes and the bluish or grayish legs...

Red-winged Tinamou
2006-09-25 14:50:24

The Red-winged Tinamou, Rhynchotus rufescens, is a medium-sized ground-living bird from southern Brazil, Paraguay, Uruguay, Bolivia and northern Argentina. It lives in a variety of habitats depending on altitude. In lowland areas it favors marshy grasslands and savanna, at higher altitudes more arid and scrubby areas. A large member of the Tinamou family, it has a curved bill and a black...

Andean Tinamou
2006-09-15 04:58:40

The Andean Tinamou, Nothoprocta pentlandii is a member of the most ancient groups of bird families, the tinamous. It is 25.5-30cm in size. This species is found in western South America. It inhabits grassy slopes, scrub, meadows. The binomial commemorates the Irish traveller Joseph Barclay Pentland (1797-1873).

Word of the Day
saggar
  • A ceramic container used inside a fuel-fired kiln to protect pots from the flame.
The word 'saggar' may come from 'safeguard'.
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