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Latest RecA Stories

2014-01-10 23:22:58

Wayland Baptist University's Jessica Kenneson, along with professor Robert Moore, have developed an imaging device that is doing the work of several much more expensive devices. Kenneson is using it for her research on tuberculosis. Plainview, TX (PRWEB) January 10, 2014 If necessity is indeed the mother of invention, freshman exuberance certainly lends a hand. Just ask Jessica Kenneson. Kenneson is a junior chemistry/molecular biology double major at Wayland Baptist University and...

2013-04-18 23:32:55

A research team from NPL and the University of Edinburgh have invented a new way to zip and unzip DNA strands using electrochemistry. The DNA double helix has been one of the most recognizable structures in science ever since it was first described by Watson and Crick almost 60 years ago (paper published in Nature in 25 April 1953). The binding and unbinding mechanism of DNA strands is vital to natural biological processes and to the polymerase chain reactions used in biotechnology to copy...

A Needle In A Haystack: How Does A Broken DNA Molecule Get Repaired?
2012-05-03 12:56:22

Scientists from the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience at Delft University of Technology have discovered a key element in the mechanism of DNA repair. When the DNA double helix breaks, the broken end goes searching for the similar sequence and uses that as a template for repair. Using a smart new dual-molecule technique, the Delft group has now found out how the DNA molecule is able to perform this search and recognition process in such an efficient way. This week, the researchers report their...

2012-02-09 10:46:32

It's been more than 50 years since James Watson and Francis Crick showed that DNA is a double helix of two strands that complement each other. But how does a short piece of DNA find its match, out of the millions of 'letters' in even a small genome? New work by researchers at the University of California, Davis, handling and observing single molecules of DNA, shows how it's done. The results are published online Feb. 8 by the journal Nature. Defects in DNA repair and copying are strongly...

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2010-06-22 12:04:23

The discovery could help to design new strategies to increase their sensitivity to antibiotics A study led by researchers from Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) describes one of the mechanisms in which pathogenic bacteria populations control the way they spread over the surface of the organs they infect and stop when they detect the presence of an antibiotic, only to resume again when the effect wears off. The star of this process is the RecA protein, which...

2010-03-08 14:35:00

Program Will Include Paid Internship Program for Students WASHINGTON, March 8 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Justice Department today announced a new internship program that will employ students part-time to conduct intensive outreach efforts with Native Americans and their families whose work in the uranium industry during the Cold War benefited the United States but exposed them to radiation and may entitle them to compensation under the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (RECA). The...

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2009-10-21 11:47:59

Researchers report that a single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB), once thought to be a static player among the many molecules that interact with DNA, actually moves back and forth along single-stranded DNA, gradually allowing other proteins to repair, recombine or replicate the strands. Their study, of SSB in the bacterium Escherichia coli, appears today in the journal Nature. Whenever the double helix of DNA unravels, exposing each strand to the harsh environment of the cell, SSB is...

2009-07-15 12:40:00

Article in Nature solves 3 major puzzles about the workings of a famous enzyme involved in DNA repairThe "sloppier copier" discovered by USC biologists is also the best sixth man in the DNA repair game, an article in the journal Nature shows.The enzyme known as DNA polymerase V (pol V) comes in when a cell's DNA is reeling from radiation damage or other serious blows. Pol V copies the damaged DNA as best it can "“ saving the life of the bacterial cell at the cost of adding hundreds of...


Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.