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Latest Receptors Stories

2010-07-16 17:32:00

LOS ANGELES, July 16 /PRNewswire/ -- Human erythropoietin (EPO) is a potent neuroprotective agent for multiple brain disorders, including stroke, brain and spinal cord injury, and Parkinson's disease. However, EPO drug development for the brain is limited, because EPO does not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In acute stroke or brain injury, the BBB is intact in the early hours after the insult when neuroprotection is still possible. Therefore, large molecule biopharmaceuticals such as...

2010-06-22 02:13:54

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease, marked by shortness of breath and fatigue which can be fatal if untreated. Increased pressure in the pulmonary artery and its branches is associated with dysfunctional growth control of endothelial and smooth muscle cells leading to excessive thickening of the blood vessel wall, obliteration of the lumen and right heart failure. BMP (bone morphogenetic protein) receptors play an important role in preventing excess growth of...

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2010-03-31 14:27:54

T cell receptors are among the most important molecules in the immune system because of their role in recognizing the antigens that signal such threats as viruses and cancer. The receptors must also distinguish these threats from the body's own cells to avoid triggering an unwanted immune system response. Recognition requires direct physical contact between the receptor and the antigen. Researchers attempting to understand this critical mechanism, therefore, have been studying such factors as...

2010-03-24 10:27:03

Walter and Eliza Hall Institute scientists have determined the structure of a previously unseen part of the insulin receptor, making possible new treatments for diabetes. The insulin receptor is a large protein on the surface of cells to which the hormone insulin binds. Insulin controls when and how glucose is used in the human body. Understanding how insulin interacts with the insulin receptor is crucial to the development of treatments for diabetes. Australian scientists revealed the...

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2010-03-12 11:14:35

Conventional biological wisdom holds that living cells  interact with their environment through an elaborate network of chemical signals. As a result many therapies for the treatment of cancer and other diseases in which cell behavior goes awry focus on drugs that block or disrupt harmful chemical signals. Now, a new road for future therapies may have been opened with scientific evidence for a never seen before way in which cells can also sense and respond to physical forces. A team of...

2009-11-30 15:26:19

Structural biologists shed light on mechanism of invasion protein Two so-called invasion proteins are crucial for infection. Each binds a specific receptor on the surface of human cells, which stimulates the host cell to take up the pathogen. Normally, these receptor molecules exert a different function, for example the regulation of cell growth and wound healing. The group's results have now been published in the current issue of the "Journal of Molecular Biology". Spoiled meat is one of the...

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2009-11-11 06:55:41

Researchers at Queen's University have found a link between two genes involved in cancer formation in humans, by examining the genes in worms. The groundbreaking discovery provides a foundation for how tumor-forming genes interact, and may offer a drug target for cancer treatment. "When cancer hijacks a healthy system, it can create tumors by causing cells to divide when they shouldn't," says Ian Chin-Sang, a developmental biologist at Queen's and lead researcher on the study. "Certain genes...

2009-07-14 10:22:41

 Pathogen recognition is the foundation of the body's immune response and survival against infection. A small cell-receptor protein called DC-SIGN is part of the immune system, and recognizes certain pathogens, including those responsible for Ebola, Dengue fever and HIV. How the molecule binds to pathogens has been unclear.New findings from a research team led by University of Illinois chemist Deborah Leckband show that flexibility in the region near the binding sites of DC-SIGN plays a...

2009-06-01 10:25:00

A review article published in the FASEB Journal shows that death receptors may be prime therapeutic targets for treating a wide variety of cancers, immune disorders and tissue injuriesIt turns out that from the perspective of cell biology, Nietzsche may have been right after all: that which does not kill us does make us stronger. In a review article published in the June 2009 print issue of The FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org), scientists from the Mayo Clinic explain how cell receptors...

2009-04-17 13:49:48

Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common malignancy and the second most frequent cause of cancer-related death in the world. The carcinogenesis of GC involved numerous genetic and epigenetic alterations, as well as many environmental risk factors. Environmental pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and halogenated hydrocarbons (HAHs) are well-known carcinogens that play important roles in GC development. The toxic effects of PAHs and HAHs are mediated by a conserved...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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