Quantcast

Latest Red blood cell Stories

2014-03-19 08:28:51

TORRANCE, Calif., March 19, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Emmaus Life Sciences, Inc. (the "Company," or "Emmaus"), a biopharmaceutical company dedicated primarily to the discovery, development and commercialization of innovative treatments and therapies for rare and orphan diseases, today announced that preliminary top-line results of its Phase 3 clinical trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of its treatment for sickle cell anemia and sickle beta-0 thalassemia met both the primary and...

2013-12-09 14:00:42

New research presented today during the 55th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition in New Orleans uncovers several important insights into the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease and thalassemia that may soon translate into the development of better, more targeted treatments for hundreds of thousands of patients worldwide. Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited, chronic disorder affecting nearly 100,000 Americans. Instead of producing healthy red blood cells,...

2013-11-27 15:34:30

New research from North Carolina State University shows that iron may play a role in preserving ancient tissues within dinosaur fossils, but also may hide them from detection. The finding could open the door to the recovery of more ancient tissues from within fossils. Mary Schweitzer, an NC State paleontologist with a joint appointment at the N. C. Museum of Natural Sciences, first announced the surprising preservation of soft tissues in a T. rex fossil in 2005. Her subsequent work...

2013-11-26 16:24:38

The blood stem cells that live in bone marrow are at the top of a complex family tree. Such stem cells split and divide down various pathways that ultimately produce red cells, white cells and platelets. These “daughter” cells must be produced at a rate of about one million per second to constantly replenish the body’s blood supply. Researchers have long wondered what allows these stem cells to persist for decades, when their progeny last for days, weeks or months before they need to...

2013-10-17 11:17:43

The mechanical properties of cells are often an indicator of disease. Cancer cells are typically soft and squishy. When the malaria parasite is inside a red blood cell, for example, the cell is stiffer than normal. Sickle cells also vary in stiffness. Research into the stiffness of diseased cells is lacking, in part due to limits in technology. Researchers have developed a new technology to sort human cells according to their stiffness, which might one day help doctors identify certain...

2013-08-07 23:22:55

"How To Increase Red Blood Cell Count" with diet is a newly published article just released at the Heart Rate Watch Company blog . Bozeman, MT (PRWEB) August 07, 2013 The Heart Rate Watch Company blog recently published a new article on "How To Increase Red Blood Count With Diet." "Endurance athletes have always been trying to find ways to increase red blood cell count since red blood cells transport oxygen and remove carbon dioxide from the body," says Rusty...

2013-06-24 10:31:18

Single cell organisms need hemoglobin to survive in an oxygen-free environment When green algae "can't breathe", they get rid of excess energy through the production of hydrogen. Biologists at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have found out how the cells notice the absence of oxygen. For this, they need the messenger molecule nitric oxide and the protein hemoglobin, which is commonly known from red blood cells of humans. With colleagues at the UC Los Angeles, the Bochum team reported in the...

Efficient Hemoglobin Key To Fish Success
2013-06-17 12:26:31

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The primordial oceans in Earth´s early days were a much more inhospitable than they are today, and new research published in the journal Science suggests that fish developed a highly efficient hemoglobin-based system to deliver large amount of oxygen to their tissues. “Four hundred million years ago the oceans were not what they are today. They were low in oxygen, high in CO2 and acidic,” said study co-author Jodie...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
Related