Quantcast

Latest Red blood cell Stories

2011-06-09 15:19:55

For tens of thousands of years, the genomes of malaria parasites and humans have been at war with one another. Now, University of Pennsylvania geneticists, in collaboration with an international team of scientists, have developed a new picture of one way that the human genome has fought back. The international team was led by Sarah Tishkoff, a Penn Integrates Knowledge professor with appointments in the genetics department in Penn's Perelman School of Medicine and the biology department of...

2011-06-08 01:16:50

Magnetic field can reduce blood viscosity If a person's blood becomes too thick it can damage blood vessels and increase the risk of heart attacks. But a Temple University physicist has discovered that he can thin the human blood by subjecting it to a magnetic field. Rongjia Tao, professor and chair of physics at Temple University, has pioneered the use of electric or magnetic fields to decrease the viscosity of oil in engines and pipelines. Now, he is using the same magnetic fields to thin...

2011-06-03 08:09:45

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Killing about a million people a year, malaria is one of the deadliest diseases in the world. Ninety percent of its victims live in Africa. The genomes of malaria parasites and humans have been battling one another for tens of thousands of years. Geneticists at the University of Pennsylvania have discovered new evidence of one way the human genome has attacked back. Since different populations show different reactions to the parasites that cause malaria, the...

de21cbeece4542bc10684826d934fefd
2011-05-27 11:23:43

NIH researchers show parasites create feeding ion channels in blood cells Snug inside a human red blood cell, the malaria parasite hides from the immune system and fuels its growth by digesting hemoglobin, the cell's main protein. The parasite, however, must obtain additional nutrients from the bloodstream via tiny pores in the cell membrane. Now, investigators from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, have found the...

2011-05-26 20:59:54

Researchers have discovered a tiny protein without which the soil and lab-dwelling worm C. elegans can't deliver iron-rich heme taken in from their diets to the rest of their bodies or to their developing embryos. The finding reported in the May 27th issue of the journal Cell, a Cell Press publication, offers important insight into the transport of the essential ingredient in worms and other animals, including humans. Researchers say it also suggests a strategy for the development of drugs...

2011-05-26 20:58:20

Using a tiny bloodless worm, University of Maryland Associate Professor Iqbal Hamza and his team have discovered a large piece in the puzzle of how humans, and other organisms, safely move iron around in the body. The findings, published in the journal Cell, could lead to new methods for treating age-old scourges - parasitic worm infections, which affect more than a quarter of the world's population, and iron deficiency, the world's number one nutritional disorder. Using C. elegans, a common...

2011-05-13 10:43:14

A cancer drug already used to treat adults and school-age children with sickle cell anemia is safe and significantly reduces pain and other complications of the disease in children as young as 9 months, according to a national study involving a UT Southwestern Medical Center researcher. Pediatric researchers at UT Southwestern and 13 other academic medical centers say hydroxyurea should be offered to all young children with sickle cell anemia, regardless of disease severity and clinical...

2011-05-10 12:47:41

Nitric oxide gas appears to directly impact the source of the classic, disabling pain crises of sickle cell disease, Georgia Health Sciences University researchers report. The short-acting gas helps unglue hemoglobin molecules that stick together, forming long chains that ultimately deform red blood cells and prompting a cellular pileup in small blood vessels and pain, said Dr. C. Alvin Head, Chairman of GHSU's Department of Anesthesiology. The findings get scientists closer to understanding...

2011-05-02 16:37:05

News tips from the 2011 Annual Meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies, April 30-May 3, Denver, Colo. Pediatricians from Johns Hopkins Children's Center and elsewhere have discovered a link between low levels of vitamin D and anemia in children. The findings, presented on May 1 at the annual meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies in Denver, Colo., show that vitamin D deficiency may play an important role in anemia. Anemia, which occurs when the body has too few oxygen-carrying red...

2011-04-28 21:16:01

Unraveled the molecular mechanism whereby sickle cell hemoglobin confers a survival advantage against malaria The latest issue of the journal Cell carries an article that is likely to help solve one of the long-standing mysteries of biomedicine. In a study that challenges currently held views, researchers at the Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência (IGC), in Portugal, unravel the molecular mechanism whereby sickle cell hemoglobin confers a survival advantage against malaria, the...


Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.