Quantcast
Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 21:20 EDT

Latest Red dwarf Stories

41284c7ffb04d21577a8da15e60199b91
2009-04-20 07:51:25

An international team, led by astronomers at the University of Hertfordshire in the UK, have discovered one of the coolest sub-stellar bodies ever found outside our own solar system, orbiting the red dwarf star Wolf 940, some 40 light years from Earth. Dr Ben Burningham of the University of Hertfordshire will present this discovery on Monday 20th April at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science conference. "Although it has a temperature of 300 degrees Celsius, which is almost hot...

747fe1995aa5389dd85a1bc6e98341fa
2009-01-05 13:10:47

Brown dwarfs, objects that are less massive than stars but larger than planets, just got more elusive, based on a study of 233 nearby multiple-star systems by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. Hubble found only two brown dwarfs as companions to normal stars. This means the so-called "brown dwarf desert" (the absence of brown dwarfs around solar-type stars) extends to the smallest stars in the universe. Sergio Dieterich of Georgia State University in Atlanta and team leader of the study is...

2008-08-25 06:00:44

DOCTOR Who is the TV show viewers would most like to see on the big screen. The revived BBC hit pipped US sitcom Friends in a Radio Times poll, with its spin-off Torchwood in ninth place. Another Beeb sci-fi favourite, comedy Red Dwarf, took third spot, followed by US hits Heroes and CSI. BBC spy drama Spooks was sixth, followed by real-time terrorist drama 24 and Lost. Cult 60s show The Prisoner, which ITV are about to revive, completed the top 10. Star Trek was voted the show that...

0640bf70f5c2dec7599ea0a5839f07611
2007-01-15 10:50:00

A recent study found 20 new star systems in the sun's local neighborhood. Most of the new discoveries are red dwarfs, much smaller and dimmer than the sun. Yet scientists are growing more confident that these stars could host habitable planets. NASA - Ancient astronomers logically focused their efforts on the brightest stars, the ones they could see in the night sky. Many modern astronomers, aided by ever-more-sensitive telescopes, have investigated objects that are unimaginably distant and...

e0b6b8b3fd871749427dd6855150e6a71
2006-12-23 10:50:00

A study published in Astrophysical Journal Letters, led by University of Texas at Austin graduate student Jacob Bean with research scientists Michael Endl and Fritz Benedict, brings new insight into how planets form around the most populous stars in our Milky Way galaxy. Bean's work shows that the chemical make-up of these "red dwarf" stars with orbiting planets is different from most of Sun-like stars that harbor planets -- and indicates that astronomers must take chemical composition into...

b56d526ee819972ca40f77fc478178341
2006-06-07 17:58:33

Washington, DC. -- A new explanation for forming "super-Earths" suggests that they are more likely to be found orbiting red dwarf stars -- the most abundant type of star -- than gas giant planets like Jupiter and Saturn. The theory, by Dr. Alan Boss of the Carnegie Institution's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, describes a mechanism whereby UV radiation from a nearby massive star strips off a planet's gaseous envelope exposing a super-Earth. The work, published in the June 10, 2006,...

5c8b3b4d160a6efcf063f158a9c9b65b1
2006-01-30 09:25:00

Cambridge, MA -- Common wisdom among astronomers holds that most star systems in the Milky Way are multiple, consisting of two or more stars in orbit around each other. Common wisdom is wrong. A new study by Charles Lada of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) demonstrates that most star systems are made up of single stars. Since planets probably are easier to form around single stars, planets also may be more common than previously suspected. Astronomers have long known...

697a569eb96bfc5314b5c46734df72321
2005-11-30 18:01:06

A team of French and Swiss astronomers [1] have discovered one of the lightest exoplanets ever found using the HARPS instrument [2] on ESO's 3.6-m telescope at La Silla (Chile). The new planet orbits a star belonging to the class of red dwarfs. As these stars are very common, this discovery proves crucial in the census of other planetary systems. "Our finding possibly means that planets are rather frequent around the smallest stars," says Xavier Delfosse, from the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique...

4a7c26df90a68be32e84f398313a52f41
2005-11-17 07:25:00

More than half the stars in our galaxy are small, dim M dwarfs. Until recently, scientists believed these stars put out too little light to support life on any planets that orbited them. But at a recent workshop held at the SETI Institute, a multidisciplinary group of researchers concluded not only that M dwarfs might host habitable planets, but that they might also be good targets in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. Astrobiology Magazine -- Scientists have been searching...

554a0472e0959da5b1ab98daec5872c61
2005-08-29 13:25:54

M-dwarf stars, much smaller, dimmer and cooler than stars like our sun, are by far the most common type of star in our galaxy. Yet scientists searching for life on other worlds have not shown much interest in M dwarfs. That's about to change. Astrobiology Magazine -- When you look up at the night sky, none of the stars you see are M dwarfs. These diminutive stars, much smaller and dimmer than our own sun aren't bright enough to see with the naked eye. Yet M dwarfs (also known as red dwarfs)...


Latest Red dwarf Reference Libraries

6_9182d2d493640e91b36f6c6769af79e62
2004-10-19 04:45:42

Red Dwarf -- A red dwarf is a small star on the main sequence, either late K or M spectral type. They have a diameter and mass of less than one-third that of the Sun (down to 0.08 solar masses, which are Brown dwarves) and a surface temperature of less than 3,500 K. They emit little light, sometimes as little as 1/10,000th that of the sun. Due to the slow rate at which they burn hydrogen red dwarves have a enormous lifespan, estimates range from a tens of billions up to trillions of...

More Articles (1 articles) »