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Latest Reef Check Stories

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2008-07-07 06:00:00

Half of all U.S. coral reefs, the center of marine life in the Pacific and Caribbean oceans, are either in poor or fair condition, a federal agency warns today. The report by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration places much of the blame on human activities and warns of further oceanwide decline. Reefs closer to cities were found to suffer poorer health, damaged by trash, overfishing and pollution. "Human impacts are making the big difference," says NOAA's Timothy Keeney,...

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2006-07-04 08:44:57

CHARLOTTE AMALIE, U.S. Virgin Islands -- Caribbean Sea temperatures have reached their annual high two months ahead of schedule - a sign coral reefs may suffer the same widespread damage as last year, scientists said Monday. Sea temperatures around Puerto Rico and the Florida Keys reached 83.5 degrees Saturday - a high not normally seen until September, said Al Strong, a scientist with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Coral Reef Watch. "We've got a good two more...

2006-06-22 13:05:26

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO (Reuters) - Less than 2 percent of the world's tropical coral reefs are properly protected from illegal fishing, mining or pollution despite government promises of wider safeguards, an international study showed on Thursday. "The figures are depressing," said Camilo Mora, a scientist at Dalhousie University in Canada and lead author of the study, carried out in New Zealand by researchers from seven nations. "Many countries create...

2006-06-22 13:05:00

By Alister Doyle, Environment Correspondent OSLO (Reuters) - Less than 2 percent of the world's tropical coral reefs are properly protected from illegal fishing, mining or pollution despite government promises of wider safeguards, an international study showed on Thursday. "The figures are depressing," said Camilo Mora, a scientist at Dalhousie University in Canada and lead author of the study, carried out in New Zealand by researchers from seven nations. "Many countries create marine...

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2006-03-31 06:50:00

WASHINGTON -- A one-two punch of bleaching from record hot water followed by disease has killed ancient and delicate coral in the biggest loss of reefs scientists have ever seen in Caribbean waters. Researchers from around the globe are scrambling to figure out the extent of the loss. Early conservative estimates from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands find that about one-third of the coral in official monitoring sites has recently died. "It's an unprecedented die-off," said National...

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2006-03-14 05:10:00

By Michael Perry SYDNEY -- When marine scientist Ray Berkelmans went diving at Australia's Great Barrier Reef earlier this year, what he discovered shocked him -- a graveyard of coral stretching as far as he could see. "It's a white desert out there," Berkelmans told Reuters in early March after returning from a dive to survey bleaching -- signs of a mass death of corals caused by a sudden rise in ocean temperatures -- around the Keppel Islands. Australia has just experienced its warmest year...

2005-10-13 04:49:55

WASHINGTON, D.C., October 13, 2005 "“ Three leading marine conservation organizations will complete an extensive survey next week along the west coast of Aceh Province, Indonesia, to determine the impact of last year's devastating earthquake and tsunami on the region's coral reefs. The Khaled bin Sultan Living Oceans Foundation, Reef Check and The World Conservation Union (IUCN) will carry out a two-week survey from October 17-31 of over 600 kilometers of Aceh's southwest coast to...

2005-09-06 07:56:47

IN THE WATER OFF SUMMERLAND KEY, Fla. (AP) -- Hovering above a coral reef, two divers in wet suits examine and measure the dozens of coral beneath them, recording their findings on clipboards and waterproof paper. The pair are conducting a new, state-funded study to analyze the health of the coral reef off Florida's coast that scientists hope will change the way reefs are cared for worldwide. The data will show scientists for the first time the health of the entire reef - about 300 miles...

2005-08-24 17:15:00

Coral reefs, the rainforests of the sea, feed a large portion of the world's population, protect tropical shorelines from erosion, and harbor animals and plants with great potential to provide new therapeutic drugs. Unfortunately, reefs are now beset by problems ranging from local pollution and overfishing to outbreaks of coral disease and global warming. Although most scientists agree that reefs are in desperate trouble, they disagree strongly over the timing and causes of the coral reef...

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2005-04-26 13:07:34

VICTORIA (AFP) -- Marine biologists this week launched an appeal for more funds to monitor and protect the world's imperiled coral reefs, warning that rampant damage to the undersea ecosystems poses a global threat. "The threat to coral reefs is therefore no longer just an island problem but a world concern," Seychelles Environment Minister Ronny Jumeau told more than 80 marine experts gathered here for a five-day conference. With about 20 percent of the earth's reefs damaged beyond repair,...


Word of the Day
conjunto
  • A style of popular dance music originating along the border between Texas and Mexico, characterized by the use of accordion, drums, and 12-string bass guitar and traditionally based on polka, waltz, and bolero rhythms.
The word 'conjunto' comes through Spanish, from Latin coniūnctus, past participle of coniungere, to join together; see conjoin