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Latest Reef Stories

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2011-03-20 06:44:28

Research can help assess impacts of climate change, other threats to coral reef ecosystems University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science scientist Chris Langdon and colleagues developed a new tool to monitor coral reef vital signs. By accurately measuring their biological pulse, scientists can better assess how climate change and other ecological threats impact coral reef health worldwide. During a March 2009 experiment at Cayo Enrique Reef in Puerto Rico, the...

2011-03-09 13:44:31

Preserving an intact population of weed-eating fish may be vital to saving the world's coral reefs from being engulfed by weed as human and climate impacts grow. A new study by researchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies has found weed-eaters like parrotfish and surgeonfish can only keep coral reefs clear of weed up to a point. After the weeds reach a certain density, they take over entirely and the coral is lost. For some years researchers have pinned their hopes on...

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2011-02-25 12:59:18

Thriving coral triangle depends on S. China Sea and Solomon Is. for reef diversity University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science faculty were part of an international scientific team to show that strong links between the corals reefs of the South China Sea, West Pacific and Coral Triangle hold the key to preserving fish and marine resources in the Asia-Pacific region. Rosenstiel School researchers Drs. Claire Paris and Robert Cowen and colleagues from the ARC...

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2011-02-24 09:10:00

Warming seas, rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide and other factors such as over-fishing could wipe out the world's coral reefs by 2050 unless urgent action is taken to counteract these threats, environmental advocates warned on Wednesday. More than three quarters of all reefs are currently threatened, said advocates from U.S. government and non-governmental organizations while releasing the report entitled, "Reefs at Risk Revisited." Swift action must be taken to protect these...

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2011-02-15 09:25:47

More than a third of coral reef fish species are in jeopardy of local extinction from the impacts of climate change on coral reefs, a new scientific study has found. (Local extinction refers to the loss of species from individual locations, while they continue to persist elsewhere across their range.) A new predictive method developed by an international team of marine scientists has found that a third of reef fishes studied across the Indian Ocean are potentially vulnerable to increasing...

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2011-02-14 09:47:03

The more humanity acidifies and warms the world's oceans with carbon emissions, the harder we will have to work to save our coral reefs. That's the blunt message from a major new study by an international scientific team, which finds that ocean acidification and global warming will combine with local impacts like overfishing and nutrient runoff to weaken the world's coral reefs right when they are struggling to survive. Modeling by a team led by Dr Ken Anthony of the ARC Centre of Excellence...

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2011-02-07 06:30:00

Tropical Cyclone Yasi, a severe, top-category storm, ripped through Australia's northeast tourist coast Thursday, leveling houses and decimating crops as it hit land near the city of Cairns, gateway to Australia's Great Barrier Reef. The reef could face a slow recovery after recent flooding spewed toxic waste into its pristine waters. Marine experts say it is too early to assess the extent of the damage but the world's largest living organism, the sprawling coral structure, was very likely...

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2011-02-03 09:05:00

Experts are calling for some reefs to be closed to oyster harvesting based on research that they claim has revealed that the global population of the mollusk species is declining rapidly. An international team of investigators, led by Michael Beck, a Senior Scientist with the Nature Conservancy and a Research Associate at the University of California, Santa Cruz, examined oyster reefs in 144 bays across 44 different ecoregions, according to an American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS)...

2011-01-24 15:25:00

MOBILE, Ala., Jan. 24, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- On January 22-23, 2011, nearly 550 volunteers from Alabama and beyond donned boots and gloves and donated their time to place 16,000 bags of oyster shells along the shore - the first step to building 100 miles of oyster reef over the next three to five years in Mobile, AL. The oyster reef building project marks the first in a series of habitat restoration projects aimed at restoring Alabama's Gulf coast, an effort led by the 100-1000: Restore...

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2011-01-24 08:17:07

The key to preserving the extraordinary richness and beauty of the world's coral reefs through the coming period of fragmentation caused by climate change lies in a better understanding of how newborn coral larvae disperse across the oceans to settle and grow on new reefs. Research by scientists at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies is throwing new light on the survival and settlement rates of larvae from different coral species, as a basis for predicting how fast coral...


Latest Reef Reference Libraries

Coral Reef
2013-04-20 15:49:21

Coral reefs are submerged structures consisting of calcium carbonate secreted by corals. Coral reefs are colonies of small animals found in marine waters that enclose few nutrients. The majority of coral reefs are constructed from stony corals, which then consist of polyps that come together in groups. The polyps are like small sea anemones, to which they are very closely related. Unlike the sea anemones, coral polyps secrete hard carbonate exoskeletons which provide support and protections...

601px-Echinophilia
2012-04-03 19:33:28

Chalice Corals, are a family of stony corals in the Pectiniidae family. Members of this family are mostly colonial but at least one species, Echinomorpha nishihirai, is solitary. These corals are endemic to the Indian and Pacific oceans. Pectiniids have a number of different forms but are basically streamlined and smooth. Polyps are large and brightly colored and resemble those of members of the Mussidae family of corals. The polyps are only extended at night. Tentacles are translucent,...

800px-Massive_Starlet_Coral_(Siderastrea_siderea)
2012-04-03 19:03:15

Siderastreidae is a family of colonial, reef building stony corals. Members of this family include symbiotic algae in their tissues which help provide their energy requirements. The World Register of Marine Species lists 7 genera within this family: Anomastraea, Coscinaraea, Craterastrea, Horastrea, Psammocora, Pseudosiderastrea, and Siderastrea. Corals in this family vary in form and include massive, thickly encrusting, columnar, and irregular forms. Corallites are linked by flowing...

800px-Rugose3d
2012-04-03 18:06:52

Horn corals, known as Rugosa or Tetracoralla, are an extinct order of coral that were abundant during the Middle Ordovician to Late Permian stages. They were known as horn corals because of a unique horn-shaped chamber with a wrinkled (rugose) wall. These mostly solitary corals often reached lengths of nearly 40 inches. However, some species could form large colonies. Rugose corals have a skeleton made up of calcite that is often fossilized. Like modern corals, rugose corals were...

800px-Syringoporid
2012-04-03 17:00:56

Tabulata is a family of extinct tabulate corals. These corals lived entirely during the Paleozoic era, being found from the Ordovician to the Permian stages. There are about 300 known genera of tabulate corals, of which Aulopora, Favosites, Halysites, Heliolites, Pleurodictyum, Sarcinula and Syringopora are the most common in the fossil record. These corals were mostly found in the shallow waters of the Silurian and Devonian, after which, they became much less common. They became extinct...

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Word of the Day
siliqua
  • A Roman unit of weight, 1⁄1728 of a pound.
  • A weight of four grains used in weighing gold and precious stones; a carat.
  • In anatomy, a formation suggesting a husk or pod.
  • The lowest unit in the Roman coinage, the twenty-fourth part of a solidus.
  • A coin of base silver of the Gothic and Lombard kings of Italy.
'Siliqua' comes from a Latin word meaning 'a pod.'
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