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Latest Reef Stories

2008-10-15 15:00:12

U.S. scientists say they observed significant recovery of an endangered coral reef when they managed the reef's diversity of fish. Professor Mark Hay and co-author Deron Burkepile of the Georgia Institute of Technology constructed 32 cages on a coral reef at Key Largo, Fla. Then into each 140-cubic-foot cage, Hay and Burkepile placed different numbers of two types of herbivorous fish. During the next 10 months they measured changes in coral cover and seaweed growth. The scientists...

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2008-10-10 09:10:00

Scientists are using satellites to expand a network to watch for ocean temperature increases that can harm fragile ecosystems worldwide. On Thursday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said its Coral Reef Watch network had been expanded from 24 locations to 190 locations in the Florida Keys, the Caribbean, Australia, Hawaii, Indonesia, and in other areas across the globe. The organization monitors ocean temperatures in nearly a dozen coral reefs.  The larger, expanded...

2008-10-09 09:00:26

Entertaining at home will become trendy in today's economy, and nothing brings people closer together than dinner. Always a good reason for guests, but what to put on that giant video screen of yours? NASCAR, rodeo, rock concert, football? That'll drive a wedge through your guest list. Instead try a subtle, soothing ambiance from HD2O(TM). Announcing the release of "HD2O - The Keys," totally underwater content for entertaining guests at home. The DVD is a 67-minute underwater journey to...

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2008-10-09 07:58:58

For endangered coral reefs, not all plant-eating fish are created equal. A report scheduled to be published this week in the early edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests that maintaining the proper balance of herbivorous fishes may be critical to restoring coral reefs, which are declining dramatically worldwide. The conclusion results from a long-term study that found significant recovery in sections of coral reefs on which fish of two complementary...

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2008-10-09 07:52:54

When reef fish get a mouthful of sand, coral reefs can drown. That's the latest startling evidence to emerge from research into the likely fate of reefs under climate change and rising sea levels, at the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies (CoECRS). "We've known for a while that having a lot of sediment in the water is bad for corals and can smother them.  What we didn't realize is how permanent this state of affairs can become, to the point where it may prevent the corals...

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2008-10-07 10:34:46

Evidence suggests that 'sick Earth' extinctions more likely In geology as in cancer research, the silver bullet theory always gets the headlines and nearly always turns out to be wrong. For geologists who study mass extinctions, the silver bullet is a giant asteroid plunging to earth. But an asteroid is the prime suspect only in the most recent of five mass extinctions, said USC earth scientist David Bottjer. The cataclysm 65 million years ago wiped out the dinosaurs. "The other four have not...

2008-10-07 07:30:00

By Jonathan Adams At this seaside resort on Taiwan's southern tip, annual typhoons blast sludge and sediment onto fragile, shallow-water coral reefs. Hotels and villages sprinkle the reefs with sewage. A nuclear power plant boils them with discharged reactor-cooling water. Snorkelers and scuba divers trample on the reefs, sometimes breaking off chunks of coral as souvenirs. And in 2001 a huge cargo ship sank off Kenting, destroying the coral it landed on and spewing more than 1,000 tons of...

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2008-10-01 10:48:29

The roadmap to the future of the gorgeously-decorated fish which throng Australia's coral reefs and help earn the nation $5 billion a year from tourism may well be written in their genes. Of particular importance may be to protect "Ëœpioneer' fish populations which are able to re-colonize regions of reef devastated by global warming and other impacts or settle new areas as the corals move south, says Dr Line Bay of the ARC Centre of Excellence in Coral Reef Studies, James Cook...

2008-10-01 03:00:13

By Anonymous Underwater voyeurs vied for spots to dive reefs in the Florida Keys for the annual coral spawning, sparked by the August full moon. "It's pretty amazing to see how it works," said Dan Dawson, owner of Horizon Divers (Key Largo, Florida). "My wife sat there in the sand for an hour and all of a sudden saw the coral secretion and then saw it floating away." While corals use multiple reproductive strategies, nearly all large reefbuilding species release millions of gametes once a...

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2008-09-30 15:15:00

Algae continues to appear near one of the world's largest reefs, and experts warn that climate change could trigger a global coral die-offs by 2100. Parts of the reef have already died and have been taken over by algae caused by pollution from sewage residues flowing out of the Mexican resort city of Cancun. Coral reefs like Chitales, near the northern tip of a Caribbean reef chain stretching from Mexico to Honduras, are dying around the world as people and cities put more stress on the...


Latest Reef Reference Libraries

Coral Reef
2013-04-20 15:49:21

Coral reefs are submerged structures consisting of calcium carbonate secreted by corals. Coral reefs are colonies of small animals found in marine waters that enclose few nutrients. The majority of coral reefs are constructed from stony corals, which then consist of polyps that come together in groups. The polyps are like small sea anemones, to which they are very closely related. Unlike the sea anemones, coral polyps secrete hard carbonate exoskeletons which provide support and protections...

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2012-04-03 19:33:28

Chalice Corals, are a family of stony corals in the Pectiniidae family. Members of this family are mostly colonial but at least one species, Echinomorpha nishihirai, is solitary. These corals are endemic to the Indian and Pacific oceans. Pectiniids have a number of different forms but are basically streamlined and smooth. Polyps are large and brightly colored and resemble those of members of the Mussidae family of corals. The polyps are only extended at night. Tentacles are translucent,...

800px-Massive_Starlet_Coral_(Siderastrea_siderea)
2012-04-03 19:03:15

Siderastreidae is a family of colonial, reef building stony corals. Members of this family include symbiotic algae in their tissues which help provide their energy requirements. The World Register of Marine Species lists 7 genera within this family: Anomastraea, Coscinaraea, Craterastrea, Horastrea, Psammocora, Pseudosiderastrea, and Siderastrea. Corals in this family vary in form and include massive, thickly encrusting, columnar, and irregular forms. Corallites are linked by flowing...

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2012-04-03 18:06:52

Horn corals, known as Rugosa or Tetracoralla, are an extinct order of coral that were abundant during the Middle Ordovician to Late Permian stages. They were known as horn corals because of a unique horn-shaped chamber with a wrinkled (rugose) wall. These mostly solitary corals often reached lengths of nearly 40 inches. However, some species could form large colonies. Rugose corals have a skeleton made up of calcite that is often fossilized. Like modern corals, rugose corals were...

800px-Syringoporid
2012-04-03 17:00:56

Tabulata is a family of extinct tabulate corals. These corals lived entirely during the Paleozoic era, being found from the Ordovician to the Permian stages. There are about 300 known genera of tabulate corals, of which Aulopora, Favosites, Halysites, Heliolites, Pleurodictyum, Sarcinula and Syringopora are the most common in the fossil record. These corals were mostly found in the shallow waters of the Silurian and Devonian, after which, they became much less common. They became extinct...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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