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Reflecting telescope Reference Libraries

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Telescope
2010-09-24 17:50:57

A telescope, designed to aid the observation of remote objects, collects some form of electromagnetic radiation (such as visible light). The Netherlands developed the first known practical telescope in the 17th century. The term "telescope" was termed in order to describe Galileo's instruments in 1611. However, Galileo was not the inventor of the telescope. It was Hans Lippershey, Zacharias...

Telescope
2004-10-19 04:45:43

Telescope -- A telescope is an instrument composed of one or more lenses or mirrors to gather and focus electromagnetic radiation. Telescopes increase the observed angular size of objects, as well as their apparent brightness. The largest telescopes are used in astronomy. A telescope was first turned on the sky by Galileo Galilei, the Italian scientist. (Telescopes used for non-astronomical...

Active Optics
2004-10-19 04:45:43

Active Optics -- Active optics is a relatively new technology for astronomic telescopes. Most modern telescopes are reflectors, with the primary element being a very large mirror. Historically, a fixed weight-to-diameter relation was used to build these mirrors, limiting their maximum diameter to 5 or 6 meters (200 or 230 inches), like in the Palomar Observatory. A new generation of...

Subaru Telescope
2004-10-19 04:45:40

Image Caption: The Subaru Telescope at the Mauna Kea Observatory on Hawaii. Credit: Denys/Wikipedia (CC BY-SA 3.0) The Subaru Telescope is a 26.9-foot (8.2m) telescope located at the Mauna Kea Observatory on the Big Island of Hawaii and operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ). It had the largest primary mirror in the world until 2005. This is a reflecting...

Word of the Day
vermicular
  • Like a worm in form or movement; vermiform; tortuous or sinuous; also, writhing or wriggling.
  • Like the track or trace of a worm; appearing as if worm-eaten; vermiculate.
  • Marked with fine, close-set, wavy or tortuous lines of color; vermiculated.
  • A form of rusticated masonry which is so wrought as to appear thickly indented with worm-tracks.
This word ultimately comes from the Latin 'vermis,' worm.
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