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Latest Regeneration Stories

2012-04-27 11:38:14

Scientists at Duke University Medical Center have shown the ability to turn scar tissue that forms after a heart attack into heart muscle cells using a new process that eliminates the need for stem cell transplant. The study, published online April 26 in the journal Circulation Research, used molecules called microRNAs to trigger the cardiac tissue conversion in a lab dish and, for the first time, in a living mouse, demonstrating the potential of a simpler process for tissue regeneration....

2012-04-27 11:36:50

For the first time, researchers have converted scar tissue that forms after a heart attack into regenerated heart muscle using microRNA, according to an animal study reported in Circulation Research, an American Heart Association journal. After a heart attack, heart muscle doesn't easily regenerate and it accumulates scar tissue, made up of cells called fibroblasts – increasing risk for heart failure. "Researchers have tried various approaches, including the use of stem cells, to...

2012-04-24 09:38:42

Tulane team's research may hold promise for veteran amputees, diabetics, accident victims A research team at Tulane University will report this week that the application of high levels of oxygen to a severed bone facilitates bone regrowth, study results that may one day hold promise for injured soldiers, diabetics and other accident victims. The results of the Department of Defense-funded study will be presented at 12:25 p.m. Monday April 23, at the American Society for Biochemistry and...

2012-04-05 05:17:13

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- New research reveals new developments to reprogram scar tissue, that is a result from myocardial infarction (MI), into heart muscle cells.  Scientists believe the new approach is a "game changer" with potential to revolutionise treatment of MI. "Our ultimate hope is that, during the acute period following MI, patients will be able to receive direct injections of factors that transform the existing fibroblast cells in the "scar" into new myocytes.  The...

2012-04-02 11:22:23

The latest research developments to reprogram scar tissue resulting from myocardial infarction (MI) into viable heart muscle cells, were presented at the Frontiers in CardioVascular Biology (FCVB) 2012 meeting, held 30 March to 1 April at the South Kensington Campus of Imperial College in London. In a keynote lecture Dr Deepak Srivastava outlined his approach that has been described as a "game changer" with the potential to revolutionize treatment of MI. For the first time at the FCVB...

2012-03-26 13:26:57

Medicine's recipe for keeping older people active and functioning in their homes and workplaces – and healing younger people injured in catastrophic accidents – may include "noodle gels" and other lab-made invisible filaments that resemble uncooked spaghetti with nanoscale dimensions, a scientist said here today at the 243rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS). The world's largest scientific society, ACS is meeting here this week with reports...

2012-03-19 16:03:18

Research from a Kansas State University professor may make it easier to recover after spinal cord injury or to study neurological disorders. Mark Weiss, professor of anatomy and physiology, is researching genetic models for spinal cord injury or diseases such as Parkinson's disease. He is developing technology that can advance cellular therapy and regenerative medicine -- a type of research that can greatly improve animal and human health. "We're trying to build tools, trying to build...


Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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