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Latest Regeneration Stories

2013-04-22 14:15:38

UC San Francisco Study Examines Role of Immune Cell in Triggering Muscle Regrowth UC San Francisco scientists have discovered that muscle repair requires the action of two types of cells better known for causing inflammation and forming fat. The finding in mice, published in the April 11 issue of Cell, showed that a well-known immune cell called the eosinophil  [ee-oh-SIN-oh-fil] carries out the beneficial role in two ways — by clearing out cellular debris from damaged tissue...

2013-04-17 18:38:13

Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a specific gene that regulates the heart's ability to regenerate after injuries. The function of the gene, called Meis1, in the heart was not known previously. The findings of the UTSW investigation are available online in Nature. "We found that the activity of the Meis1 gene increases significantly in heart cells soon after birth, right around the time heart muscle cells stop dividing. Based on this observation we asked a...

Regenerative Heart Medicine Could Get Boost With Nanotechnology
2013-03-21 12:06:19

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have developed a new visualization technique which they believe could eventually help make the repair of damaged hearts through regenerative medicine a reality. In a study published in Wednesday´s edition of the journal Science Translational Medicine, senior author and Stanford radiology professor Sam Gambhir and colleagues describe how they plan to mark the stem cells...

2013-03-12 22:45:12

New technique enables more precise design of tissue architecture Researchers at Columbia Engineering have developed a new "plug-and-play" method to assemble complex cell microenvironments that is a scalable, highly precise way to fabricate tissues with any spatial organization or interest–such as those found in the heart or skeleton or vasculature. The study reveals new ways to better mimic the enormous complexity of tissue development, regeneration, and disease, and is published in...

Stem Cells In A Human Parasite Revealed Through Study
2013-02-26 09:31:26

University of Illinois From the point of view of its ultimate (human) host, the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni has a gruesome way of life. It hatches in feces-tainted water, grows into a larva in the body of a snail and then burrows through human skin to take up residence in the veins. Once there, it grows into an adult, mates and, if it´s female, starts laying eggs. It can remain in the body for decades. A new study offers insight into the cellular operations that give...

2013-02-20 14:45:24

In "before" and "after" photos from advertisements for wound-healing ointments, bandages and antibiotic creams, we see an injury transformed from an inflamed red gash to smooth and flawless skin. What we don't appreciate is the vital role that our own natural biomolecules play in the healing process, including their contribution to the growth of new cells and the development of new blood vessels that provide nutrients to those cells. Now, UCLA researchers led by Heather Maynard, a...


Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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