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Latest Regulation of gene expression Stories

2010-12-07 06:30:00

RICHMOND, Calif., Dec. 7, 2010 /PRNewswire/ -- Sangamo BioSciences, Inc. (Nasdaq: SGMO) announced today the presentation of preclinical data that demonstrate the ability to permanently correct a disease gene in an animal using systemic delivery of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs). The presentation was one of four made by Sangamo's collaborators at the 52nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), which is being held in Orlando, Florida. Abst.# 647 "Manipulating Higher...

2010-09-15 17:20:41

ChIP enrichment analysis database available free online Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine have developed a new computational method that will help streamline the analysis of gene expression experiments and provide scientists with a better mechanistic understanding of the differences between diseased and normal cells. The new database and software, called ChIP Enrichment Analysis (ChEA), will revolutionize how researchers identify drug targets and biomarkers. Researchers can find...

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2010-08-25 14:13:47

In a landmark study to be published in the journal Nature, scientists have been able to create the first picture of genetic processes that happen inside every cell of our bodies. Using a 3-D visualization method called X-ray crystallography, Song Tan, an associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Penn State University, has built the first-ever image of a protein interacting with the nucleosome -- DNA packed tightly into space-saving bundles organized around a protein core....

2010-05-06 15:41:16

Findings help illuminate biochemical mechanisms that determine stem cell function and fate Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) possess remarkable properties of self-renewal and pluripotency, the ability to become almost any kind of cell within the body. And yet they share the same genome or set of genes with lineage-committed cells, cells fated to be or do one thing. Scientists have long suspected that the distinct properties of different cells were attributable to their particular epigenomes...

2010-05-03 09:45:37

Life is almost unbearably complex. Humans and mice, frogs and flies toggle genes on and off in dizzying combinations and sequences during their relentless march from embryo to death. Now scientists seeking to understand the machinations of the proteins behind the genomic wizard's screen have a powerful new tool at their disposal, courtesy of researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Until now, researchers have relied on outdated methods of analysis to identify those DNA...

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2010-05-03 09:10:04

During embryonic development, proteins called Polycomb group complexes turn genes off when and where their activity must not be present, preventing specialized tissues and organs from forming in the wrong places. They also play an important role in processes like stem cell differentiation and cancer. In a study published online Sunday May 2 in Nature, scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) in Heidelberg, Germany, identified a new Polycomb group complex, and were...

2010-04-09 09:38:00

As published today in Science, researchers from Cambridge, Glasgow and Greece have discovered a remarkable amount of plasticity in how transcription factors, the proteins that bind to DNA to control the activation of genes, maintain their function over large evolutionary distances. The text books tell us that transcription factors recognize the genes that they regulate by binding to short, sequence-specific lengths of DNA upstream or downstream of their target genes. It was widely assumed...

2010-04-08 16:17:33

May allow investigation of how unfolding of DNA breaks down in diseases like cancer NYU Langone Medical Center researchers have developed a powerful new method to investigate the discrete steps necessary to turn on individual genes and examine how the process goes wrong in cancer and other diseases. The finding, based on seven years of research and described in the April 9 issue of Molecular Cell, allows scientists to investigate the unfolding of DNA, a process required for gene activation....

2010-03-19 10:41:45

Researchers are only beginning to understand how individual variation in gene regulation can have a lasting impact on one's health and susceptibility to certain diseases. Now, an ambitious survey of the human genome has identified differences in the binding of master regulators called transcription factors to DNA that affect how genes are expressed in different people. The study, which is published in the March 18, 2010, issue of Science, looked at two common transcription factors. HHMI...

2010-02-02 10:50:02

University of Michigan researchers have shown that tension on DNA molecules can affect gene expression---the process at the heart of biological function that tells a cell what to do. Scientists understand the chemistry involved in gene expression, but they know little about the physics. The U-M group is believed to be the first to actually demonstrate a mechanical effect at work in this process. Their paper is published in the current edition of Physical Review Letters. "We have shown that...


Word of the Day
out-herod
  • In the phrase to out-herod Herod, to be more violent than Herod (as represented in the old mystery plays); hence, to exceed in any excess of evil.
Herod refers to 'Herod the Great,' a Roman client king and 'a madman who murdered his own family and a great many rabbis.' According to the OED, the term is 'chiefly with allusion to Shakespeare's use' in Hamlet.
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