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Last updated on April 17, 2014 at 15:37 EDT

Latest Reprogramming Stories

2011-01-04 09:15:00

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- We're all familiar with the saying, "Ëœyou are what you eat.'  That is true, however, it was recently reported that we are also what our parents ate too. Researchers shed light on an emerging idea showing mice sired by fathers fed on a low-protein diet demonstrate various and reproducible changes in the activity of chief metabolic genes in their livers.  Those changes "“ despite the fact that the fathers never saw their offspring and spent...

2010-08-05 16:33:21

Next-generation reprogramming of native cells offers therapeutic advantages Scientists at the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease (GICD) have found a new way to make beating heart cells from the body's own cells that could help regenerate damaged hearts. Over 5 million Americans suffer from heart failure because the heart has virtually no ability to repair itself after a heart attack. Only 2,000 hearts become available for heart transplant annually in the United States, leaving...

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2010-06-30 06:37:19

TAU develops method for tracking adult stem cells as they regress Cell reprogramming calls The Curious Case of Benjamin Button to mind. It's a new technology that uses molecular therapy to coax adult cells to revert to an embryonic stem cell-like state, allowing scientists to later re-differentiate these cells into specific types with the potential to treat heart attacks or diseases such as Parkinson's. But at this point in the technology's development, only one percent of cells are...

2010-04-21 09:18:28

Scientists at the Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) have recently generated significant single cell expression data crucial for a detailed molecular understanding of mammalian development from fertilization to embryo implantation, a process known as the preimplantation period. The knowledge gained has a direct impact on clinical applications in the areas of regenerative medicine and assisted reproduction. This study, published in Developmental Cell on April 20, 2010, is the first of its...

2010-04-05 14:40:44

Multipotent stem cells have the capacity to develop into different types of cells by reprogramming their DNA to turn on different combinations of genes, a process called "differentiation." In a new study, researchers from the Carnegie Institution for Science have found that reprogramming is imperfect in the early stages of differentiation, with some genes turned on and off at random. As cell divisions continue, the stability of the differentiation process increases by a factor of 100. The...

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2010-03-15 10:45:00

Groundbreaking stem cell researcher Rudolf Jaenisch has been named the "hottest" researcher in the world, topping a list released Monday by Thomson Reuters' Science Watch. Jaenisch, who was born in Wölfelsgrund, Germany in 1942, is a biochemistry professor at MIT's Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research and an expert in the field of transgenics. According to a Thomson Reuters press release, "his research investigates reprogrammed fibroblast cells in models of Parkinson's disease,...

2010-02-04 07:00:00

SAN DIEGO, Feb. 4 /PRNewswire/ -- Fate Therapeutics, Inc. received a Notice of Allowance from the United States Patent and Trademark Office for U.S. Patent Application Number 10/997,146 entitled "Methods for Reprogramming Somatic Cells." Upon issuance, the patent will cover foundational induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology for identifying agents that enable the reprogramming of human somatic cells, including pluripotency genes, small molecules and biologics. The invention by...

2010-02-03 16:48:09

Increasing numbers of research studies clearly demonstrate that genetics alone cannot explain the diversity of living organisms, reports Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN). Also driving the development of such complexity is epigenetics, and the February 1 issue of GEN contains three articles that illustrate the growing recognition of the importance of this emerging field of study. "Scientists have shown that non-DNA-sequence-changing epigenetic phenomena such as histone...

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2010-01-07 08:28:06

The DNA contained within each of our cells is exactly the same, yet different types of cells "“ skin cells, heart cells, brain cells "“ perform very different functions. The ultimate fate of these cells is encoded not just in the DNA, but in a specific pattern of chemical modifications that overlay the DNA structure. These modifications, or epigenetic markers as they are called, are stably carried in our genomes -- except for at times when the cells change their fate, such as what...

2009-11-05 12:54:04

The same genes that are chemically altered during normal cell differentiation, as well as when normal cells become cancer cells, are also changed in stem cells that scientists derive from adult cells, according to new research from Johns Hopkins and Harvard. Although genetically identical to the mature body cells from which they are derived, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are notably special in their ability to self-renew and differentiate into all kinds of cells. And now scientists...