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Latest Reptile Stories

9d03d8a9182c1993d9f4971614cb77c01
2009-01-21 14:29:31

The fossil of a lizard-like New Zealand reptile has been identified by a team of scientists from UCL (University College London), University of Adelaide, and the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa. The fossil, dating back 18 million years, has triggered fresh arguments over whether the continent was fully submerged some 25 million years ago. Today, the endangered New Zealand tuatara (Sphenodon) is a lizard-like reptile that is the only survivor of a group that was globally widespread at...

3ca4982c66b6780371f571c16e96ecb11
2009-01-14 16:15:00

New British research finds that the Archaeopteryx lithographica seems to have been more like a bird than a reptile in terms of hearing ability. The researchers based their conclusion on their discovery that the length of a part of the inner ear of reptiles and birds can help predict their hearing ability. The team examined whether the length of the cochlear duct, which lies in the inner ear and is part of the cochlea, could be used to deduce hearing ability in a group of modern birds and...

2009-01-07 09:52:46

Pterosaurs have long suffered an identity crisis. Pop culture heedlessly "” and wrongly "” lumps these extinct flying lizards in with dinosaurs. Even paleontologists assumed that because the creatures flew, they were birdlike in many ways, such as using only two legs to take flight.Now comes what is believed to be first-time evidence that launching some 500 pounds of reptilian heft into flight required pterosaurs to use four limbs: two were ultra-strong wings which, when folded...

2008-12-18 13:54:39

U.S. scientists say polygamous, but devoted, paternal care exhibited by male emus and other ground-dwelling birds can be traced to their dinosaur ancestors. Researchers said they have long wondered about the origins of polygamy and paternal care patterns among modern-day Paleognathes -- an ancient avian lineage that branched off after birds evolved from dinosaurs and includes ostriches, emus and tinamous. No such reproductive behavior exists among the majority of other vertebrates, with males...

d76558ffb152fae8dde8350fdd3754681
2008-12-13 13:55:16

Scientists say a peculiar, bony armored amphibian prowled warm lakes 210 million years ago, catching fish and other tasty snacks with one of the most unusual bites in the history of life on Earth. Gerrothorax pulcherrimus lived alongside some of the early dinosaurs and opened its mouth not by dropping its lower jaw, as other vertebrate animals do, instead, it lifted back the top of its head in a way that looked a lot like lifting the lid of a toilet seat. Harvard University's Farish Jenkins,...

2008-12-13 05:53:25

Police in Alabama say that the person who removed 22 tree boa snakes from a garden shed was simply concerned about the welfare of the reptiles. Jacob Brooks of Prallville, Ala., filed a theft report when he returned home and found his pets missing, the Montgomery Advertiser reported. The Amazon tree boas had total value of $10,000. Police Chief Alfred Wadsworth said that no criminal charges are being considered in the case. He said that the motive for the removal was to get the snakes to a...

2008-12-10 16:08:46

A North Carolina teenager with bone cancer received an unusual gift Wednesday from the Make A Wish Foundation -- new cages for her snakes. The foundation handed over the cages to Elizabeth Mize, 16, of Angier at the Museum of Life and Science in Durham, The Raleigh News & Observer reported. The cages, 6 feet high, have lights and heat. The foundation also supplied rocks and plants the teen can use to make her pets feel at home. The foundation, which grants wishes for children with...

8d4e451191b56aa447bb9343378b4d8c1
2008-11-19 15:19:53

The Royal Society journals have reported that the earliest turtles known to live in water have been discovered on a Scottish island. The reptile fossils, thought to be some 164 million years old, were found on a beach in southern Skye, off the UK's west coast. A team from London's Natural History Museum and University College London (UCL) uncovered them. Experts say the new species"”embedded in a block of rock at the bay of Cladach a'Ghlinne, on the Strathaird peninsula"”forms a...

ba1cde4950a3beebaa439d7a3b456b651
2008-11-07 14:46:02

Turtles nesting along the Mississippi River and other areas are altering their nesting dates in response to rising temperatures, says a researcher from Iowa State University. Fred Janzen, a professor in ecology, evolution and organismal biology, has studied turtle nesting habits and also accumulated research going back decades in order to track the habits of the turtles to find out when they make nests and lay eggs. "The results have been astonishing," says Janzen. "In some cases such as...

18ed13fd7ebc90f604da68929e4839431
2008-11-07 14:40:00

Sea snakes may slither in saltwater, but they sip the sweet stuff. So concludes a University of Florida zoologist in a paper appearing this month in the online edition of the November/December issue of the journal Physiological and Biochemical Zoology. Harvey Lillywhite says it has been the "long-standing dogma" that the roughly 60 species of venomous sea snakes worldwide satisfy their drinking needs by drinking seawater, with internal salt glands filtering and excreting the salt. Experiments...


Latest Reptile Reference Libraries

0_8f023dda3e8dc6d6beae9a3c48deec69
2007-04-15 20:58:50

The Brown Basilisk or Striped Basilisk, Basiliscus vittatus, is a species of lizard native to Central America, but have been introduced into the wild in the U.S. state of Florida. They are also called the common basilisk and, the "Jesus Lizard" because when it flees from predators it runs very fast and can even run on top of water. Basilisks actually have large hind feet with flaps of skin between each toe. The fact that they move quickly across the water, aided by their web-like feet,...

41_494fd8b7a6b410724559fb7ea5a8f7c8
2007-02-12 21:53:31

The Diamondback Terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin, is a species of turtle native to the brackish coastal swamps of the eastern and southern United States. They are found from as far north as Cape Cod, Massachusetts to as far south as Corpus Christi, Texas. The species is named for the diamond pattern on top of its shell, but the pattern and coloration varies greatly by species. The coloring of the shell can vary from browns to grays, and their body color can be gray, brown, yellow, or white....

41_a0daff1f5ebb65f11d0909cf4bbc58a5
2007-01-23 14:56:02

The Spectacled Caiman, Caiman crocodilus, is a crocodilian reptile found in much of Central and South America. It lives in a range of lowland wetland and river habitat and can tolerate salt water as well as fresh. Due to this adaptable behavior, it is the most common species of caiman. Males of this species are between 6 and 8.2 feet long, while females are smaller, usually around 4 and a half feet long. The species' common name comes from the bony ridge between the eyes, which give the...

41_93e4f388ab06b6a0e833d14535bd3020
2007-01-02 11:35:55

The Perentie is the largest monitor lizard native to Australia. They are found west of the Great Dividing Range in the arid regions of Australia. They are not a common sight and can usually escape detection before it has a chance to be seen. An adult Perentie can grow up to 8 feet long although its average size is 5.5 to 6.5 feet long. It is likely the third largest lizard on earth, after the Komodo Dragon, and the Water Monitor. Crocodile Monitors rival the Perentie in being the third...

36_5237f625c5a54ce7651ce0b01e5f94dc
2005-06-15 17:26:29

The Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis) is the largest lizard in the world, growing to a length of about 10 feet (3 meters) and weighing between 175 to 310 lb (80 and 140 kg). It is a member of the monitor lizard family, Varanidae. Dragons have keen senses and are considered among the most intelligent living reptiles. They are carnivorous, hunting live prey with a stealthy approach followed by a sudden short charge (they can run briefly at speeds up to 20 km/h). They have a strong bite...

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Word of the Day
snash
  • To talk saucily.
  • Insolent, opprobrious language; impertinent abuse.
This word is Scots in origin and probably imitative.