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Latest Reptile Stories

76df42527f323d00fd929df1d38daa491
2010-02-10 06:47:00

Reptiles are bred in captivity primarily for their skins, but some restaurants and population groups also want them for their meat. A study shows that eating these animals can have side effects that call into question the wisdom of eating this 'delicacy.' Parasites, bacteria and viruses, and to a lesser extent contamination from heavy metals and residues of veterinary drugs-"“ eating reptile meat can cause several problems to health. This is the conclusion of a study published in the...

140896d1b72f7a64a861762dcc4685a11
2010-01-15 10:45:12

Scientists have discovered that air flows in one direction as it loops through the lungs of alligators, just as it does in birds. The results, published in this week's issue of the journal Science, suggest that this breathing method may have helped dinosaurs' ancestors dominate Earth after the planet's worst mass extinction 251 million years ago. Before and until about 20 million years after the extinction--called "the Great Dying" or the Permian-Triassic extinction--mammal-like reptiles...

6f491f63bd3ed344fa2af56cc1917b6a1
2009-11-30 11:23:19

The Aznalc³llar mining accident more than 11 years ago, which contaminated part of the Doñana National Park, also damaged reptile habitat there. Now a team of Spanish researchers, who have been studying the reptile community since 2000, have shown, by setting up artificial refuges, that the disappearance of natural refuges had a serious impact on lizard and snake numbers. Nine years ago, researchers from the University of Granada (UGR) and the University of Barcelona...

2009-11-06 04:00:00

WILMINGTON, N.C., Nov. 6 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Today a U.S. House Subcommittee will consider H.R. 2811 a bill that could determine the fate of much of the reptile trade in the United States. Introduced by U.S. Representative Kendrick Meek (D-FL), who recently announced his candidacy for the U.S. Senate, the bill could add the entire genus python to the Injurious Wildlife list of the Lacey Act; a designation reserved for only the most dangerous alien invaders to our natural eco-system....

2009-09-29 14:37:30

A Canadian financial adviser with a can-do attitude waded into a pond and grabbed an alligator-like caiman that had residents of London, Ontario, nervous. Calls to the police about sightings of either an alligator or crocodile began during the weekend, but animal control officers who responded didn't see anything, the London Free Press reported Tuesday. Tuesday, John Stephan was walking his small dog when he saw two television news trucks and a small group of people near a pond. He was told...

2009-09-21 09:26:56

U.S. and British scientists say they've determined the transition of extinct sea creatures from egg-laying to live-born opened up evolutionary pathways. Scientists at Harvard University and the University of Reading say they also determined the evolution of such live-born young depended crucially on the advent of genes -- rather than incubation temperature -- as the primary determinant of offspring sex. In the study of three lineages of extinct marine reptiles -- mosasaurs, sauropterygians...

2009-09-16 14:04:24

Live birth -- key to much marine life -- depends upon evolution of chromosomal sex determination A new analysis of extinct sea creatures suggests that the transition from egg-laying to live-born young opened up evolutionary pathways that allowed these ancient species to adapt to and thrive in open oceans. The evolutionary sleuthing is described this week in the journal Nature by scientists at Harvard University and the University of Reading who also report that the evolution of live-born...

2009-09-02 23:55:00

Reptiles are not known to be the most social of creatures. But when it comes to laying eggs, female reptiles can be remarkably communal, often laying their eggs in the nests of other females. New research in the September issue of The Quarterly Review of Biology suggests that this curiously out-of-character behavior is far more common in reptiles than was previously thought. Dr. J. Sean Doody (The Australian National University) and colleagues, Drs. Steve Freedberg and J. Scott Keogh,...

77e94c70da1ea584b08b2012d561b4c7
2009-09-02 14:44:32

Turtles and other reptiles offer clues to the development of 4 chambers and to congenital heart disease Scientists at the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease (GICD) have traced the evolution of the four-chambered human heart to a common genetic factor linked to the development of hearts in turtles and other reptiles. The research, published in the September 3 issue of the journal Nature, shows how a specific protein that turns on genes is involved in heart formation in turtles,...

c698322fcafba6df31372cee512f30751
2009-08-20 06:25:00

Scientists have discovered a small strip of land found frozen in time in petrified mud where a pterosaur once landed in search for food 140 million years ago. When the ancient reptile touched down, its feet pressed into soft mud leaving behind prints that fossilized and have now been identified.  After examining the preserved footprints, scientists determined that the pterosaur stalled in the air shortly before touching down, a technique also used by many modern birds. Scratch marks left...


Latest Reptile Reference Libraries

0_8f023dda3e8dc6d6beae9a3c48deec69
2007-04-15 20:58:50

The Brown Basilisk or Striped Basilisk, Basiliscus vittatus, is a species of lizard native to Central America, but have been introduced into the wild in the U.S. state of Florida. They are also called the common basilisk and, the "Jesus Lizard" because when it flees from predators it runs very fast and can even run on top of water. Basilisks actually have large hind feet with flaps of skin between each toe. The fact that they move quickly across the water, aided by their web-like feet,...

41_494fd8b7a6b410724559fb7ea5a8f7c8
2007-02-12 21:53:31

The Diamondback Terrapin, Malaclemys terrapin, is a species of turtle native to the brackish coastal swamps of the eastern and southern United States. They are found from as far north as Cape Cod, Massachusetts to as far south as Corpus Christi, Texas. The species is named for the diamond pattern on top of its shell, but the pattern and coloration varies greatly by species. The coloring of the shell can vary from browns to grays, and their body color can be gray, brown, yellow, or white....

41_a0daff1f5ebb65f11d0909cf4bbc58a5
2007-01-23 14:56:02

The Spectacled Caiman, Caiman crocodilus, is a crocodilian reptile found in much of Central and South America. It lives in a range of lowland wetland and river habitat and can tolerate salt water as well as fresh. Due to this adaptable behavior, it is the most common species of caiman. Males of this species are between 6 and 8.2 feet long, while females are smaller, usually around 4 and a half feet long. The species' common name comes from the bony ridge between the eyes, which give the...

41_93e4f388ab06b6a0e833d14535bd3020
2007-01-02 11:35:55

The Perentie is the largest monitor lizard native to Australia. They are found west of the Great Dividing Range in the arid regions of Australia. They are not a common sight and can usually escape detection before it has a chance to be seen. An adult Perentie can grow up to 8 feet long although its average size is 5.5 to 6.5 feet long. It is likely the third largest lizard on earth, after the Komodo Dragon, and the Water Monitor. Crocodile Monitors rival the Perentie in being the third...

36_5237f625c5a54ce7651ce0b01e5f94dc
2005-06-15 17:26:29

The Komodo Dragon (Varanus komodoensis) is the largest lizard in the world, growing to a length of about 10 feet (3 meters) and weighing between 175 to 310 lb (80 and 140 kg). It is a member of the monitor lizard family, Varanidae. Dragons have keen senses and are considered among the most intelligent living reptiles. They are carnivorous, hunting live prey with a stealthy approach followed by a sudden short charge (they can run briefly at speeds up to 20 km/h). They have a strong bite...

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