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2009-04-26 23:00:00

A researcher at Ohio State University says he is working on producing larger bluegill by breeding super males with two Y chromosomes. The male bluegill are about twice as big as females and thus more profitable for fish farmers, The Columbus Dispatch reported Sunday. Han-Pin Wang, a researcher in the Ohio State aquaculture lab, uses a method based on the genetic difference between males and females. Like humans, male bluegill normally have an XY chromosome pair while females have XX. Wang...

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2009-04-01 14:42:05

Researchers said on Wednesday that water deep below ground has safely trapped carbon dioxide for millions of years and may one day help absorb emissions of the greenhouse gas to help slow climate change, Reuters reported. Chris Ballentine, a researcher at the University of Manchester, who worked on the study, said the finding shows that such carbon capture and storage is possible provided scientists find an area where the geology is suitable. Therefore, researchers can locate ancient deep...

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2009-04-01 12:15:00

A Texas A&M University researcher says the historical stance that Abner Doubleday invented baseball is incorrect. Texas A&M said in a news release Tuesday history Professor David Vaught said while Doubleday has been credited with creating the U.S. pastime in 1839, he has found cases of the sport being played in New York before that date. The game was played in upstate New York long before Doubleday was supposed to have invented it in a cow pasture in Cooperstown , N.Y., in 1839,...

2009-03-05 20:44:28

An Israeli researcher said gifted children have many talents, but are more likely to limit the use of these talents. Instead of selecting from the many options open to them, researcher Dr. Inbal Shani of the University of Haifa said gifted children tended to limit themselves to applied or prestigious subjects. The researchers surveyed 800 gifted and non-gifted high-school students and examined the differences in self-concept and other psychological variables. The results showed that while...

2009-02-21 19:28:55

Battery-powered buses that can cover 188 miles on one charge and recharge in 20 minutes will hit the road in China in June, a researcher says. Seventy of the 24-passenger buses, powered by lithium-ion batteries, will be put to use in Jilin province in northeastern China, Xinhua reported Friday. The government of Liaoyuan was buying 20 and Changchun's city government had ordered 50, the state-run news agency said. Xie Haiming, a researcher at the province's Lithium-ion Battery Material S&T...

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2009-02-09 16:18:05

Body composition, anthropometrical dimensions and morphological characteristics play a key role in the success of soccer players. The objective of the new study was to evaluate the body composition and body image of a group of top-flight soccer players and compare the results with those of a group of university students used as control subjects. Marta Arroyo, lead author of the study and researcher at the University of the Basque Country explained to SINC that "the initial hypothesis was that...

2009-02-05 08:26:00

HAMPTON, Va., Feb. 5 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Most of the universe remains mysterious to scientists and researchers everywhere. More than 90 percent of the universe is "dark," composed of dark energy and dark matter observed only by their gravitational interaction with both light and "normal" matter. (Logo: http://www.newscom.com/cgi-bin/prnh/20081007/38461LOGO) Understanding the nature of dark energy and matter is one of the most significant challenges in science -- one that researcher...

2009-02-02 10:42:01

Drugs called statins that can help lower an individual's cholesterol levels are needed by up to 11 million older U.S. residents, a new study suggests. Yale University researcher Dr. Erica Spatz said her JUPITER study of 18,000 people found that older individuals said to have normal low-density lipoprotein levels should be taking statins to significantly reduce their risk of a stroke or heart attack, USA Today said Monday. If Spatz's cholesterol warning were heeded by those millions of U.S....

2009-01-28 16:30:00

A researcher at England's Newcastle University says cows with names tend to be happier and more productive than their nameless fellow cows. Dr. Catherine Douglas said she analyzed data collected from more than 500 British dairy farms of varying sizes, and found that cows given names by farmers produce an average extra pint and a half of milk per day, adding up to an extra 6,800 gallons a year for an average dairy farm, The Daily Mail reported Wednesday. Douglas said cows with names also tend...

2009-01-28 16:29:23

Breastfeeding may reduce the chance of children developing asthma, but a Canadian researcher says fast-food may negate the breast feeding benefits. Dr. Anita Kozyrskyj of the University of Alberta finds eating fast-food more than once or twice a week negated the beneficial effects of breastfeeding in protecting children from the respiratory disease. Like other studies, we found that fast-food consumption was associated with asthma, Kozyrskyj says in a statement. The research confirmed the...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.