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Latest Respiratory physiology Stories

2010-07-12 13:53:49

A retired but well-preserved mechanism for regulating viruses that has worked its way into the human genome appears to modulate a switch between adult and fetal hemoglobin production, Medical College of Georgia researchers report. That switch could be the key to more targeted therapies for sickle cell patients whose misshaped adult hemoglobin hinders its ability to deliver oxygen throughout the body. Fetal hemoglobin, on the other hand, can't take on the dysfunctional sickle shape. After...

2010-06-29 14:30:00

SAN DIEGO, June 29 /PRNewswire/ -- Sangart, Inc., today announced that enrollment was completed in a Phase IIa clinical study of MP4OX (oxygenated pegylated hemoglobin) in severely injured trauma patients with hemorrhagic shock causing lactic acidosis. Complete study results are expected, after follow up of outcomes in these patients, in the second half of 2010. "The hemorrhagic shock that results from severe trauma can cause organ dysfunction and even death," said Karim Brohi, global...

2010-06-16 07:00:00

IRVINE, Calif., June 16 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Masimo (Nasdaq: MASI), the inventor of Pulse CO-Oximetry(TM) and Measure-Through Motion and Low Perfusion pulse oximetry, announced today that a new independent study demonstrating the clinical accuracy of Masimo noninvasive and continuous hemoglobin (SpHb) monitoring was presented this week at the European Society of Anaesthesiology (ESA) Annual Congress in Helsinki, Finland. In the study, titled "Comparison Between a New Noninvasive...

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2010-06-08 09:10:00

A new study pinpoints the genetic changes that enable Tibetans to thrive at altitudes where others get sick. In the online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, an international team has identified a gene that allows Tibetans to live and work more than two miles above sea level without getting altitude sickness. A previous study published May 13 in Science reported that Tibetans are genetically adapted to high altitude. Now, less than a month later, a second study by...

2010-05-26 10:31:00

PHILADELPHIA, May 26 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Complex wounds affect more patients in the United States than heart attack and stroke combined. About 150,000 amputations a year result from complex wounds, while about 80,000 are attributed to diabetes and peripheral arterial disease. There are currently no established methods for early detection of wound healing, or for precise identification of healing progress. A new device developed by researchers can change chronic wound management....

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2010-05-14 10:35:00

Researchers have discovered the secret of how Tibetans are able to live comfortably in rarefied air at very high altitudes. Scientists have found that Tibetans have a special genetic feature that allows them to breathe easy in higher places.  The researchers analyzed the genes of 31 Tibetans who were unrelated to each other, and compared them to the DNA of 90 Chinese and Japanese individuals living in low-lying areas. The scientists from China and the U.S. wrote in a paper published in...

2010-05-12 15:00:00

IRVINE, Calif., May 12 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Staten Island University Hospital and Masimo (Nasdaq: MASI), the inventor of Pulse CO-Oximetry(TM) and Measure-Through Motion and Low Perfusion pulse oximetry, today jointly announced the system-wide conversion of Staten Island University Hospital to Masimo's advanced noninvasive oximetry technology. The conversion ensures that all hospital patients will be noninvasively monitored using the most technologically and clinically-advanced...

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2010-05-03 06:05:00

Scientists discovered that mammoths had blood that displayed "antifreeze" like qualities, which kept their bodies supplied with oxygen at sub-zero temperatures. The journal Nature Genetics reported that scientists extracted a blood protein, known as hemoglobin, from mammoth remains. The study of the hemoglobin led researchers to find those antifreeze properties. The hemoglobin protein is found in red blood cells where it binds to and carries oxygen. The scientists found that mammoths...

2010-04-27 14:03:58

Black children with chronic kidney disease have more severe anemia than white children even when they receive the same treatment, according to a multicenter study led by Johns Hopkins Children's Center to be published in the May issue of the American Journal of Kidney Disease. The findings suggest that inherent biological differences, rather than access to care and treatment, may be at play, raising the question whether current guidelines for anemia treatment should be tailored to reflect...

2010-04-20 08:18:56

The leading cause of death in infants born prematurely is respiratory distress syndrome. It is caused by deficiency in a fat-protein complex known as lung surfactant, which is critical for optimal gas exchange in the lung. LPCAT1 is a recently identified mouse lung protein predicted, based on in vitro assays, to be involved in the generation of surfactant. Now, John Shannon and colleagues, at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, have demonstrated that LPCAT1 has a crucial role in...