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Latest Rhinitis Stories

2011-09-20 05:55:18

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — Eating low-fat yogurt while pregnant can increase the risk of your child developing asthma and hay fever, according to this study. The study aimed to assess whether fatty acids found in dairy products could protect against the development of allergic diseases in children. The researchers assessed milk and dairy intake during pregnancy and monitored the prevalence of asthma and hay fever using registries and questionnaires in the Danish National Birth Cohort....

healthpress-082611-001
2011-08-26 11:12:41

Hot chili peppers are known to make people "tear up," but a new study led by University of Cincinnati allergy researcher Jonathan Bernstein, MD, found that a nasal spray containing an ingredient derived from hot chili peppers (Capsicum annum) may help people "clear up" certain types of sinus inflammation. The study, which appears in the August 2011 edition of Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, compares the use of the Capsicum annum nasal spray to a placebo nasal spray in 44...

2011-07-23 00:00:41

The SinusWars team has found the answer to Nasal Congestion with Age-Old Ingredients New York, NY (PRWEB) July 22, 2011 SinusWars10 is a combination of homeopathic ingredients that work to complement each other in the battle against nasal congestion. Much research has been done on one of the ingredients and it is worth a special mention. The chilli pepper where Capsicum originates from is a fascinating ingredient. Some interesting facts say that magical herbalism appropriates the god of war...

2011-06-28 20:52:55

A cellulose powder has been used increasingly for many years against allergic rhinitis. Still, there has been a shortage of scientific evidence for its efficacy in seasonal allergic rhinitis (hay fever), particularly in children. Now, however, scientists from the Sahlgrenska Academy and the Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences at the University of Gothenburg have proven that the cellulose powder reduces symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis in children, without any adverse...


Word of the Day
kenspeckle
  • Having so marked an appearance as easily to be recognized.
This word may come from the Swedish 'kanspak,' quick at recognizing persons or things, or else from confusion with 'conspicuous.'