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Latest Rhinolophidae Stories

Unusually Cold Spring Causing Bat Declines In Britain
2013-07-08 08:10:05

Lawrence LeBlond for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Because of an unusually cold spring and an insect shortage this summer, conservationists are concerned bat numbers could continue to suffer this year. Based on the latest figures from Britain's National Bat Monitoring Programme (NBMP), the annual bat breeding season got off to a slow start due to unseasonable weather earlier this year. Dr. Kate Barlow, Head of Monitoring at the Bat Conservation Trust, said, "After 2 years of long,...

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2010-05-19 13:20:54

Communication across species boundaries by echolocation calls in bats Bats can distinguish between the calls of their own and different species with their echolocation calls, report scientists of the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen. This applies even for species closely related and ecologically similar with overlap of call frequency bands (The American Naturalist online, May 11th 2010). As opposed to bird song or the human voice, echolocation calls are primarily used for...

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2009-07-07 15:40:00

A research paper co-written by a Virginia Tech faculty member explains a 60-year mystery behind a rare bat's nose that is unusually large for its species. The findings soon will be published in the scientific trade journal, Physical Review Letters.The article, "Acoustic effects accurately predict an extreme case of biological morphology," by Z. Zhang, R. Mller, and S.N. Truong, details the adult Bourret's horseshoe bat (known scientifically as the "Rhinolophus paradoxolophus," meaning...

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2009-06-18 13:54:35

Slow-flying, woodland bats "” which tend to be at greater risk from extinction than their speedier kin "” really don't like the light, according to a study published online on June 18th in Current Biology, a Cell Press publication. Lesser horseshoe bats will stray from their usual flight routes to steer clear of the artificial glow from lights that are similar to everyday street lights, the new report shows. The echolocation bats depend on to navigate their way in the dark doesn't...


Latest Rhinolophidae Reference Libraries

Greater Horseshoe Bat, Rhinolophus ferrumequinum
2012-09-03 06:50:52

The greater horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum) can be found in Japan, Africa, Europe, China, South Asia, Korea, and Australia. It prefers a habitat in warm regions, with open scrub and trees, human settlements, and bodies of water like ponds. It will also inhabit older orchards, glades within woodlands, and permanent pastures, among other areas. Many of its roosts occur in houses in the northern areas of its range and in caves in the southern areas of its range. These bats travel to...

Lesser Horseshoe Bat, Rhinolophus hipposideros
2012-05-24 13:35:31

The lesser horseshoe bat (Rhinolophus hipposideros) is a European bat, and is the smaller relative of the greater horseshoe bat. The range of this bat is slightly spotty, and it occurs in many areas with warmer habitats that are up to 6,561 feet in elevation. During the winter, the highest elevation known for a nursery roost is 3,116 feet. It prefers to live in wooded areas or limestone, as well as foothill and highland areas. The lesser horseshoe bat is one of the smallest bats in the...

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2007-01-19 11:51:53

Horseshoe bats (the Rhinolophidae family) are a large family of bats including approximately 130 species grouped in 10 genera. They belong to the suborder Microchiroptera (microbats). All Rhinolophids have leaf-like protuberances on their noses. In Rhinolophines species, these take the shape of a horseshoe. They emit sonar calls through these structures, which may serve to focus the sound. Most Rhinolophids are dull brown or reddish brown in color. They vary in size from small to...

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Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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