Quantcast

Latest Richard Smalley Stories

2012-07-09 17:19:27

Rice University study details exactly how nanotubes bend and break What´s 100 times stronger than steel, weighs one-sixth as much and can be snapped like a twig by a tiny air bubble? The answer is a carbon nanotube – and a new study by Rice University scientists details exactly how the much-studied nanomaterials snap when subjected to ultrasonic vibrations in a liquid. “We find that the old saying ℠I will break but not bend´ does not hold at the micro- and...

2011-04-08 07:49:00

HOUSTON, April 8, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Keith Maxwell announced today that he will be hosting a breakfast to discuss Nanotechnology and its importance to the future of energy and the nation, and to encourage investor involvement in this essential strategic initiative. The breakfast will be held Friday, April 15 from 7:30-9:30am at the River Oaks Country Club. Maxwell will be joined by renowned Nano energy experts Dr. Wade Adams, Dr. Andrew Barron and Dr. James Tour, with the Smalley...

2010-07-15 02:50:39

Rice researchers' method untangles long tubes, clears hurdle toward armchair quantum wire Rice University scientists have found the "ultimate" solvent for all kinds of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a breakthrough that brings the creation of a highly conductive quantum nanowire ever closer. Nanotubes have the frustrating habit of bundling, making them less useful than when they're separated in a solution. Rice scientists led by Matteo Pasquali, a professor in chemical and biomolecular engineering...

5bb68200af91da194d481d2701e7a0d51
2010-05-10 11:19:44

Rice researchers spin pure batches of nanotubes species In two new papers, Rice University researchers report using ultracentrifugation (UCF) to create highly purified samples of carbon nanotube species. One team, led by Rice Professor Junichiro Kono and graduate students Erik Haroz and William Rice, has made a small but significant step toward the dream of an efficient nationwide electrical grid that depends on highly conductive quantum nanowire. The other, led by Rice Professor Bruce...

2010-04-09 13:02:00

BETHESDA, Md., April 9 /PRNewswire/ -- Lockheed Martin (NYSE: LMT) and Rice University are celebrating the 25th anniversary of a breakthrough that has advanced technology in fields from medicine to baseball. Lockheed Martin is sponsoring the Year of the Nano, Rice's celebration of the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of the buckminsterfullerene molecule -- the "buckyball" -- that enables nanotechnology. The buckyball, a perfect, soccer ball-shaped molecule of 60 carbon atoms, is one of the...

2009-11-03 07:59:44

Rice University scientists yesterday unveiled a method for the industrial-scale processing of pure carbon-nanotube fibers that could lead to revolutionary advances in materials science, power distribution and nanoelectronics. The result of a nine-year program, the method builds upon tried-and-true processes that chemical firms have used for decades to produce plastics. The research is available online in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. "Plastics is a $300 billion U.S. industry because of...

2009-01-27 12:22:00

Nanotechnology Center Planned to Spur Energy Innovation and Job Creation HOUSTON, Jan. 27 /PRNewswire/ -- The Nano World Headquarters (NWHQ), located in the Houston, Texas region, will serve as the leading global center for scientific nanotechnology collaboration and as an accelerator for start-up companies. The initiative -- situated in one of the fastest growing regions in the U.S. and recognized as a world leader in science, technology and energy innovation -- represents a national...

4849cd93109f069190278278089ceefb1
2008-10-17 13:40:00

Researchers at Florida State University say a material commonly known as "buckypaper" could revolutionize the way everything from airplanes to TVs are made. Buckypaper, which resembles ordinary carbon paper, is 10 times lighter but potentially 500 times stronger than steel when sheets of it are stacked and pressed together to form a composite. But unlike conventional composite materials, it conducts electricity like copper or silicon and disperses heat like steel or brass. "All those things...

2008-08-18 18:00:37

By MEREDITH PRICE LEVITT Nanotechnology takes the concept of small to new heights. Derived from the Greek word nanos, which means dwarf, nanotechnology deals with structures that are approximately one- billionth of a meter in size. That's about 1,000 times smaller than the diameter of one human hair. The applications for this technology are far-reaching - including aerospace, automotive, biomedical, microelectronics, semiconductors, pharmaceuticals, photo catalysts and sports...

66631a6429af31ff682a861c0e3c008d1
2007-09-11 06:00:00

By Thurs, Daniel Patrick In the summer of 2002, MIT's new Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies (ISN) found itself at the center of a controversy. The subject of debate was not the technical specifications of a new nanomaterial or a breakthrough in nanoscale electronics. It was about a comic book. The proposal that had won the five-year, $50 million grant to establish the ISN included a drawing of what the soldier of the future might look like. Her impressive outfit, set against a...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
Related