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Latest Risk factor Stories

2009-03-30 09:35:33

Researchers at Emory University School of Medicine created the Health ABC Heart Failure Model for predicting risk of new onset heart failure in the elderly. Now that model has been strengthened by validating it in a separate library of patient data from an earlier cardiovascular study. The results suggest the Health ABC risk model can be used to identify high-risk individuals for whom interventions can be targeted cost-effectively to prevent heart failure. "This is a scoring system that could...

2009-01-28 08:56:50

Risk stratification has become central to strategies for the prevention of coronary heart disease, with the implication that priority is given to those at highest risk (ie, those with established heart disease). However, such stratification using the conventional risk estimation models may not be accurately achieved in individuals without symptoms, especially those in younger age groups whose 10-year "short-term" estimated risk seems low.For example, while the Framingham Risk Score is...

2008-12-18 20:10:55

British researchers found a direct link between psychological distress and an increased risk of heart disease. However, the study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, said much of the impact was also traced to smoking. The 7-year-long study of 6,576 men and women participating in the Scottish Health Survey found that after age and sex were taken into account, people with depression and anxiety had more than a 50 percent increased risk of heart disease than...

2008-12-17 11:52:53

Health professionals should acknowledge decades of research that egg consumption is not a significant risk factor for heart disease, a U.S. researcher says. Leila M. Barraj of Exponent's Health Sciences Center for Chemical Regulation and Food Safety in Menlo Park, Calif., said the study found that the consumption of one egg per day contributes less than 1 percent to heart disease risk. Modifiable lifestyle risk factors -- smoking, poor diet, being overweight or obese and physical inactivity...

2008-08-14 09:00:19

To: NATIONAL EDITORS Contact: Dr. Erin D. Michos, MD, MHS, Division of Cardiology of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, +1-410-502-6813, Cell: +1-410-371- 7596, edonnell@jhmi.edu CHEVY CHASE, Md., Aug. 14 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A new study published in the July/August 2008 issue of Journal of Women's Health highlights the importance of women knowing their own risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and cautions that a frequently used risk assessment tool could lead to false...

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2008-01-31 09:20:00

Whether you're a Giants or Patriots fan, you might want to consider your heart when tuning in to this year's Super Bowl.  A German study that took place during the 2006 World Cup Soccer Championship revealed that an emotional response to a sporting event might provoke a coronary event, particularly in those already at risk.   In fact, the researchers concluded that viewing a stressful a stressful soccer match more than doubled the risk of an acute cardiovascular...

2006-08-24 12:24:01

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Less educated women face a greater risk of developing heart disease, research from Sweden shows. This is largely because women with fewer years of schooling are more likely to have heart disease risk factors such as cigarette smoking, sedentary lifestyle, high body mass index, high blood pressure and diabetes, researchers report. There is a well-established link between lower socioeconomic status and higher heart disease risk among men, the research team...

2006-07-12 18:04:54

LONDON (Reuters) - People who live alone are twice as likely to suffer serious heart disease as those who live with a partner, according to research published on Thursday. Doctors found the risk was even higher among older people, after conducting a study of 138,000 people aged between 30 and 69 in the Danish city of Aarhus. The reasons for the increased risk were unclear, said Kirsten Nielsen, of Aarhus Sygehus University Hospital, who reported the findings in the Journal of...

2006-07-12 18:00:00

LONDON (Reuters) - People who live alone are twice as likely to suffer serious heart disease as those who live with a partner, according to research published on Thursday. Doctors found the risk was even higher among older people, after conducting a study of 138,000 people aged between 30 and 69 in the Danish city of Aarhus. The reasons for the increased risk were unclear, said Kirsten Nielsen, of Aarhus Sygehus University Hospital, who reported the findings in the Journal of Epidemiology and...

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2006-02-28 00:05:00

By Amy Norton NEW YORK -- Men with a bright outlook on life seem to be less likely to die of heart disease or stroke than their more pessimistic peers, Dutch researchers report. The findings, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, add to evidence that natural optimists may be a hardier breed. In an earlier study, the same researchers found a lower risk of death from any cause within a given timeframe among older adults who had generally optimistic attitudes. The new study followed...


Word of the Day
conjunto
  • A style of popular dance music originating along the border between Texas and Mexico, characterized by the use of accordion, drums, and 12-string bass guitar and traditionally based on polka, waltz, and bolero rhythms.
The word 'conjunto' comes through Spanish, from Latin coniūnctus, past participle of coniungere, to join together; see conjoin