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Latest river blindness Stories

2013-02-01 09:46:19

Fight against river blindness is successful and inexpensive A relatively inexpensive program set up to combat river blindness, an infectious disease, has resulted in major health improvements in Africa, shows a study conducted by Erasmus University Medical Center researchers. The study, due to be published January 31 in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, shows that US$250 million helped cure or prevent blindness, skin disease, severe itching, and other symptoms in millions of people. In...

2012-08-23 11:00:05

Scientists at the University of Liverpool have found that the worm which causes River Blindness survives by using a bacterium to provide energy, as well as help 'trick' the body's immune system into thinking it is fighting a different kind of infection. River Blindness affects 37 million people, mainly in sub-Saharan Africa, causing intense itching of the skin, visual impairment and in severe cases, irreversible blindness. It is caused by a parasitic worm that is transmitted by...

2012-04-09 13:22:13

Black flies drink blood and spread disease such as river blindness-creating misery with their presence. A University of Georgia study, however, proves that the pesky insects can be useful. Don Champagne, an entomology professor with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, discovered a way to use the black fly's blood-sucking tactics for medical advancement. "In order to feed on blood, these insects have to contend with our natural defense agents against blood...

2011-07-07 14:48:07

Also used for treating lice in children and heartworm in pets, ivermectin could add malaria to long list of diseases it currently helps control A cheap, common heartworm medication that is already being used to fight other parasites in Africa could also dramatically interrupt transmission of malaria, potentially providing an inexpensive tool to fight a disease that kills almost 800,000 people each year, according to a new study published today in the July edition of the American Journal of...

2010-02-09 14:30:00

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute have discovered a potential new use for the drug closantel, currently the standard treatment for sheep and cattle infected with liver fluke. The new research suggests that the drug may be useful in combating river blindness, a tropical disease that is the world's second leading infectious cause of blindness for humans. The study is scheduled for publication in an advance, online Early Edition of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of...

2009-07-03 12:03:17

A new drug to be tested in three African countries could greatly reduce cases of onchocerciasis, commonly called river blindness, health officials said. This is a devastating illness that has plagued 30 African countries for centuries, said Dr. Uche Amazigo, director of the African Program for Onchocerciasis Control. More than 100 million Africans are at risk of infection from the disease, Amazigo said. The drug, moxidectin, developed by Wyeth Pharmaceuticals, kills the larvae and adult worms...

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2009-07-01 16:50:24

The World Health Organization said Wednesday that a drug commonly used to treat pets with parasites may offer hope in eradicating river blindness. Moxidectin, prescribed for dogs, cats, cattle and horses to treat parasites, shows potential to destroy the worms that cause river blindness, an infectious disease that threatens 100 million people, the U.N. agency said.  The condition, whose formal name is onchocerciasis, comes with debilitating symptoms such as loss of sight, severe rashes...

2009-04-13 07:55:04

The saliva from a fly may be able to save someone's eyesight. Researchers from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have found what they call a "magic potion" of proteins in the saliva of the black fly that help it spread parasites that cause onchocerciasis or river blindness "“  a devastating eye-disease. They say a better understanding of these proteins may lead to better drugs and a vaccine for river blindness and other diseases spread by biting insects....


Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.