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Latest Riversleigh Stories

Mid Miocene Nimbacinus dicksoni
2014-04-10 12:28:55

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online The biggest known carnivorous marsupial of the modern era – the Tasmanian tiger - or thylacine - went extinct in the early 20th century. Now, researchers have found that a distant, ancient relative of the thylacine was able to hunt down prey larger than itself, according to a new study in the open-access journal PLOS ONE. Based solely on a recovered 16- to 11.5-million-year-old skull, the study team was able to create a virtual...

Obdurodon tharalkooschild
2013-11-05 03:26:12

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online The discovery of a lone tooth in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area of Queensland, Australia, has led to the classification of a new, giant, now-extinct species of platypus known as the Obdurodon tharalkooschild. The new species in the duck-billed, egg-laying mammal’s family is detailed in the latest edition of the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, and while the precise age of the fossil has not been yet been determined, it...

501eba2b009c035381e0fdc4ccd5f4db1
2010-11-03 11:57:48

Surprising first ancestor of bizarre marsupial moles The mysterious origins of Australia's bizarre and secretive marsupial moles have been cast in a whole new and unexpected light with the first discovery in the fossil record of one of their ancestors. The find reveals a remarkable journey through time, place and lifestyle: living marsupial moles are blind, earless and live underground in the deserts of the Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia, yet their ancestors lived...

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2010-07-09 08:00:00

The remains of a strange, prehistoric saber-tooth cat have been unearthed in an ancient former rainforest in Australia, scientists said Thursday. Paleontologist Henk Godthelp, who led the discovery, said this is the first time the carnivore had been seen in Australia. He called the find an exciting and unique discovery. The animal is "sort of like a native cat with a broad flattish head with large canines," said Godthelp. "It's an animal we don't think we've seen before up at Riversleigh so...

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2009-12-20 09:10:00

Skull fragments of prehistoric koalas from the Riversleigh rainforests of millions of year ago suggest they shared the modern koala's "lazy" lifestyle and ability to produce loud "bellowing" calls to attract mates and provide warnings about predators. However, the new findings published as the featured cover article in the current issue of The Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology suggest that the two species of koalas from the Miocene (24 to five million years ago) did not share the uniquely...

2009-07-29 10:23:16

A bizarre New Zealand bat that is as much at home walking four-legged on the ground as winging through the air had an Australian ancestor 20 million years ago with the same rare ability, a new study has found.The discovery overturns a long-held held view that the agile walking and climbing skills of the lesser short-tailed bat - Mystacina tuberculata "“ evolved in the absence of any ground-dwelling mammal competitors or predators, says an international team of researchers led by Dr...


Latest Riversleigh Reference Libraries

42_b808c29881fb7a3b3d89f98b7f14be01
2006-12-12 12:50:21

The Thylacine (Thylacinus cynocephalus) is a large carnivorous marsupial native to Australia, which is thought to have become extinct in the 20th century. It is also known as the Tasmanian Tiger, Tasmanian Wolf, Marsupial Wolf, and the Tassie (or Tazzy) Tiger or simply the Tiger. It was the only member of its genus, Thylacinidae, although a number of related species have been found in the fossil record dating back to the early Miocene. The Thylacine was extinct on the Australian mainland...

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Word of the Day
reremouse
  • A bat.
The word 'reremouse' comes from Middle English reremous, from Old English hrēremūs, hrērmūs ("bat"), equivalent to rear (“to move, shake, stir”) +‎ mouse.
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