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Latest RNA editing Stories

2014-02-07 12:48:23

Protein controls editing, expanding the information content of DNA An international team of researchers, led by scientists from the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Indiana University, have identified a protein that broadly regulates how genetic information transcribed from DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA) is processed and ultimately translated into the myriad of proteins necessary for life. The findings, published today in the journal Cell Reports, help explain how...

2013-09-30 10:19:30

A research team centered at Brown University has compiled the largest and most stringently validated list of RNA editing sites in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, a stalwart of biological research. Their research, which yielded several insights into the model organism's fundamental biology, appears Sept. 29 in Nature Structural & Molecular Biology. The "master list" totals 3,581 sites in which the enzyme ADAR might swap an "A" nucleotide for a "G" in an RNA molecule. Such a...

2012-08-20 16:30:14

Scientists have cracked a molecular code that may open the way to destroying or correcting defective gene products, such as those that cause genetic disorders in humans. The code determines the recognition of RNA molecules by a superfamily of RNA-binding proteins called pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins. When a gene is switched on, it is copied into RNA.  This RNA is then used to make proteins that are required by the organism for all of its vital functions.  If a gene...

2012-04-24 22:54:30

Research also finds how RNA editing enzyme activity varies with temperature Because a function of RNA is to be translated as the genetic instructions for the protein-making machinery of cells, RNA editing is the body's way of fine-tuning the proteins it produces, allowing us to adapt. The enzyme ADAR, which does this editing job in the nervous system of creatures ranging from mice to men, even edits itself. In a new study that examined the self-editing process and locked it down at two...

2012-02-13 14:55:25

Study published in the journal Nature Biotechnology In a new study published online in Nature Biotechnology, researchers from BGI, the world's largest genomics organization, reported the evidence of extensive RNA editing in a human cell line by analysis of RNA-seq data, demonstrating the need for new robust methods to identify important post-transcriptional editing events. RNA editing is a normal but not yet fully understood process in which small nucleotide changes occur after DNA has...

2011-12-26 07:22:05

Biologists use technology to observe individual differences in fruit flies To track what they can't see, pilots look to the green glow of the radar screen. Now biologists monitoring gene expression, individual variation, and disease have a glowing green indicator of their own: Brown University biologists have developed a "radar" for tracking ADAR, a crucial enzyme for editing RNA in the nervous system. The advance gives scientists a way to view when and where ADAR is active in a living...

2011-10-31 11:26:45

Penn study in fruit flies has implications for autism, other cognitive impairment syndromes The most common form of heritable cognitive impairment is Fragile X Syndrome, caused by mutation or malfunction of the FMR1 gene. Loss of FMR1 function is also the most common genetic cause of autism. Understanding how this gene works is vital to finding new treatments to help Fragile X patients and others. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and...

2011-09-16 11:26:27

A team of scientists at the CSIC has shown that temperature can play a critical role in the control of splicing. The team led by Josep Vilardell, ICREA scientist at the CSIC's Molecular Biology Institute of Barcelona, has demonstrated that temperature, through its effects on RNA structure, can control how the genetic information will be processed. The results of this work are published this week in Molecular Cell. Hiding intronic cues For some time, scientists have been trying to...

2010-09-01 20:51:36

"There's an app for that." To a cadre of scientists, the familiar phrase will soon mean they can enter a specific RNA from baker's yeast into their iPhone and see a depiction of its two-dimensional structure - thanks to a new technology developed by scientists at Stanford University. The application is cool, but it's just window dressing for the real advance: For the first time, it's possible to experimentally capture a global snapshot of the conformation of thousands of RNA molecules in a...

2009-06-16 09:34:58

For many years scientists have known that the numerous biological functions of an organism are not regulated solely by the DNA sequence of its genes: Superordinate regulatory mechanisms exist that contribute to determining the fate of genes. Although they are not anchored in the DNA, they can even be passed on to subsequent generations to a certain extent. Intensive research in recent years has shown that these mechanisms "“ bundled under the term epigenetics, are very multifaceted and...


Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.