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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 21:20 EDT

Latest RNA splicing Stories

Faulty Enzymes Cause Diabetic Cardiomyopathy
2013-11-07 09:18:20

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online A family of enzymes that controls the functions of other proteins could be the possible cause of heart failure in diabetics, according to new research appearing in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. While many studies have been written on cardiovascular disease and diabetes, little is known about diabetic cardiomyopathy, a disorder of the heart muscle in diabetes patients that can lead to the heart’s inability to effectively...

Unraveling Secrets Of The Mechanism That Snips Our Genes
2013-09-27 09:50:05

Brandeis University Certain diseases such as cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy are linked to genetic mutations that damage the important biological process of rearranging gene sequences in pre-messenger RNA, a procedure called RNA splicing. These conditions are difficult to prevent because scientists are still grasping to understand how the splicing process works. Now, researchers from Brandeis University and the University of Massachusetts Medical School have teamed up to unravel...

2013-07-12 23:34:31

New enclosure is flexible, allows for expansion Spartanburg, SC (PRWEB) July 11, 2013 AFL Introduces Optical Splicing and Distribution Enclosure AFL is introducing the LL-580 optical splicing and distribution enclosure designed for organizing, splicing and interconnecting fibers. The enclosure addresses the need to patch, patch and splice, express cut/drop fibers and manage wavelengths (WDM or splitters) in a single enclosure. Given its flexibility, the enclosure is an ideal fit for...

2013-06-24 14:45:26

Scientists from Australia and the United States bring new insights to our understanding of the three-dimensional structure of the genome, one of the biggest challenges currently facing the fields of genomics and genetics. Their findings are published in Nature Genetics, online today. Roughly 3 meters of DNA is tightly folded into the nucleus of every cell in our body. This folding allows some genes to be 'expressed', or activated, while excluding others. Dr Tim Mercer and Professor John...

2013-06-13 10:00:50

Microbes are living more than 500 feet beneath the seafloor in 5 million-year-old sediment, according to new findings by researchers at the University of Delaware and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI). Genetic material in mud from the bottom of the ocean – called the deep biosphere –revealed an ecosystem of active bacteria, fungi and other microscopic organisms at depths deeper than a skyscraper is high. The findings were published in Nature on June 12. “This...

2013-03-18 08:36:49

New software features for optimal splices ANAHEIM, Calif., March 18, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- OFC/ NFOEC 2013, Booth 2627 -- OFS, a leading designer, manufacturer and supplier of innovative fiber optic network products, has announced that its Furukawa Electric FITEL® SmartFuse(TM) fusion splicing software has been enhanced to include automated optimal facial-fit alignment and a new effective live fiber splicing method. The FITEL SmartFuse facial-fit alignment software provides the...

Shining Light On Important Role Performed By Dark Matter Within Each Of Our Genes
2013-01-07 09:28:56

University of North Carolina Health Care Research findings from the University of North Carolina School of Medicine are shining a light on an important regulatory role performed by the so-called dark matter, or "junk DNA," within each of our genes. The new study reveals snippets of information contained in dark matter that can alter the way a gene is assembled. "These small sequences of genetic information tell the gene how to splice, either by enhancing the splicing process or...

2012-09-10 14:24:17

$100,000 prize honors female scientists who have made extraordinary contributions to biomedical science NEW YORK, Sept. 10, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Joan A. Steitz, Ph.D., a pioneer in the field of RNA biology whose discoveries involved patients with a variety of autoimmune diseases, will be awarded the 2012 Pearl Meister Greengard Prize from The Rockefeller University. The prize, which honors female scientists who have made extraordinary contributions to biomedical science and...

2012-08-15 11:57:20

Targeted 'negative ASOs' cause missplicing and pathogenesis, providing unique window on disease progression A team led by scientists at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has developed a new way of making animal models for a broad class of human genetic diseases — those with pathology caused by errors in the splicing of RNA messages copied from genes. To date, about 6,000 such RNA "editing" errors have been found in various human illnesses, ranging from neurodegenerative disorders...

2012-06-18 11:24:22

Tiny, transient loops of genetic material, detected and studied by the hundreds for the first time at Brown University, are providing new insights into how the body transcribes DNA and splices (or missplices) those transcripts into the instructions needed for making proteins. The lasso-shaped genetic snippets – they are called lariats – that the Brown team reports studying in the June 17 edition of Nature Structural & Molecular Biology are byproducts of gene transcription....