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Latest RNA splicing Stories

2011-06-14 01:16:57

Many more hereditary diseases than previously thought may be caused, at least in part, by errors in pre-mRNA splicing, according to a computer analysis by Brown University scientists. That could be good news because research suggests it may be possible to fix bad splicing. A new Brown University computer analysis that predicts the effect of genetic mutations on how the body splices mRNA indicates as many as a third of disease-related mutations may be linked to splicing problems "” more...

2011-06-13 16:03:15

Genetic splicing mechanism triggers both premature aging syndrome and normal cellular aging National Institutes of Health researchers have identified a new pathway that sets the clock for programmed aging in normal cells. The study provides insights about the interaction between a toxic protein called progerin and telomeres, which cap the ends of chromosomes like aglets, the plastic tips that bind the ends of shoelaces. The study by researchers from the National Human Genome Research...

2011-06-08 07:00:00

SUNNYVALE, Calif., June 8, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- Today, Molecular Devices, a leading provider of instruments, software, and consumables for drug discovery and life sciences research, announced the launch of the GenePix® SL50 Slide Loader and GenePix® Pro 7.2 Software for an accelerated microarray workflow. (Logo: http://photos.prnewswire.com/prnh/20100406/SF82092LOGO) Research needs change continually as science advances; Molecular Devices designed...

2011-04-18 17:37:56

Amish population in Ohio has large numbers of MOPD1 Researchers have identified a genetic mutation found in the Ohio Amish population as the cause of a fatal developmental disease in fetuses and infants, according to research published in the April 8, 2011, issue of Science. The genetic mutation is caused by a defect during the cellular protein-making process, causing microcephalic osteodysplastic primoridal dwarfism type 1 (MOPD1), a rare developmental disorder that greatly slows fetal...

2011-04-07 22:12:14

Fetuses with defects in a molecular machine that edits information cells use to make proteins can develop a rare form of dwarfism, according to a new study led by researchers at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center "“ Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute (OSUCCC "“ James). The defect, triggered by a tiny gene mutation, causes microcephalic osteodysplastic primoridal dwarfism type 1 (MOPD1), a rare developmental disorder that...

2011-03-10 23:36:25

Lasers used to study splicing of pre-messenger RNA molecules From neurosurgery to bar code readers, lasers have been used in a myriad of applications since they were first introduced in the late 1950's. Now, with the work being done in Jeff Gelles' Lab at Brandeis University, researchers have developed a way to use lasers to study the splicing of pre-messenger RNA molecules, an essential process in creating proteins to sustain advanced organisms, including human life. This process of splicing...

2011-01-31 13:37:28

DNA was originally thought to have a single function:  to help cells make the proteins they need.  Any DNA that is not immediately required to produce proteins was written off as "junk" and deemed unworthy of study.  Recently, however, it has become clear that junk DNA performs a wide range of important tasks.  As a result, attention is shifting to asking why some organisms have so much of it and other organisms so little.  A particular puzzle is posed by so-called...

2010-11-18 16:32:57

Implications for brain diseases such as epilepsy, according to Penn study Cells have their own version of the cut-and-paste editing function called splicing. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have documented a novel form of splicing in the cytoplasm of a nerve cell, which dictates a special form of a potassium channel protein in the outer membrane. The channel protein is found in the dendrites of hippocampus cells -- the seat of memory, learning, and spatial...

2010-10-15 17:13:40

Implications for autoimmune and neurological diseases How a T cell decides to make protein X, Y, or Z can have profound effects for fighting foreign invaders or staving off dire autoimmune reactions. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have identified the steps that control how different forms of an immune cell protein called CD45, which is critical for activating the immune system when faced with pathogens, are controlled in the arc of a body's immune response....

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2010-10-05 08:36:57

Supercomputer simulations at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory are helping scientists unravel how nucleic acids could have contributed to the origins of life. A research team led by Jeremy Smith, who directs ORNL's Center for Molecular Biophysics and holds a Governor's Chair at University of Tennessee, used molecular dynamics simulation to probe an organic chemical reaction that may have been important in the evolution of ribonucleic acids, or RNA, into early life...


Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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