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Latest Robert Boyd Stories

2014-01-20 12:45:12

Measurement technology continues to show its potential for quantum information Until recently measuring a 27-dimensional quantum state would have been a time-consuming, multistage process using a technique called quantum tomography, which is similar to creating a 3D image from many 2D ones. Researchers at the University of Rochester have been able to apply a recently developed, alternative method called direct measurement to do this in a single experiment with no post-processing. The work...

2013-03-04 13:22:04

Physicists make first direct measurements of polarization states of light Researchers at the University of Rochester and the University of Ottawa have applied a recently developed technique to directly measure for the first time the polarization states of light. Their work both overcomes some important challenges of Heisenberg's famous Uncertainty Principle and also is applicable to qubits, the building blocks of quantum information theory. They report their results in a paper published...

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2011-08-01 08:45:00

Research shows large-scale cooperation may have begun with fear of punishment By Bobbie Mixon, NSF "Cooperation and Punishment" sounds like it could be the title of a hit television program, especially when the bit about stealing cows is added. But instead it's the theoretical basis of new research that looks at how members of early human societies learned to work together in large groups. In a study supported by the National Science Foundation, Sarah Mathew and Robert Boyd, anthropologists...

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2010-04-30 13:05:00

Humans are incredibly cooperative, but why do people cooperate and how is cooperation maintained? A new research study by UCLA anthropology professor Robert Boyd and his colleagues from the Santa Fe Institute in New Mexico suggests cooperation in large groups is maintained by punishment. The finding challenges previous cooperation/punishment models that argue punishment is uncoordinated and unconditional. Boyd and his team report their research in the April 30 issue of the journal Science....

2007-10-04 06:00:13

By Cordes, Christian Since their emergence during the second half of the nineteenth century, Darwin-inspired, instinct-based theories of human agency have delivered the psychological foundations of American Institutionalism (see e.g., Dorfman 1963; Rutherford 2000; Asso and Fiorito 2004). Consequently, at the beginning of the twentieth century, early institutionalists like Thorstein Veblen, Wesley Mitchell, John R. Commons and others employed instinct theory in their analysis of economic...


Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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