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Latest Robert H. Grubbs Stories

2005-10-05 16:28:51

By Jason Szep BOSTON (Reuters) - At age 8, Richard Schrock treasured a life-altering gift from his older brother: a chemistry set whose explosive solutions and puzzling directions ignited a passion that culminated on Wednesday with the Nobel Prize. The birthday present from his 13-year-old brother Theodore exposed Schrock to the heart of chemistry -- the transformation of matter -- that propelled the son of an Indiana carpenter to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he...

2005-10-05 13:40:06

By Simon Johnson STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Frenchman Yves Chauvin and Americans Robert Grubbs and Richard Schrock won the 2005 Nobel Chemistry prize for showing how to tailor-make molecules for cheaper, cleaner chemicals and drugs to combat major diseases. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded them the 10 million crown prize for work in metathesis, where molecules "dance round and change partners" to create new molecules. In an unusual step, two men from the committee then took...

2005-10-05 08:09:53

By Simon Johnson STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Frenchman Yves Chauvin and Americans Robert Grubbs and Richard Schrock won the 2005 Nobel Chemistry prize for showing how to tailor-make molecules for cheaper, cleaner chemicals and drugs to combat major diseases. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded them the 10 million crown prize for work in metathesis, where molecules "dance round and change partners" to create new molecules. In an unusual step, two men and two women from the...

2005-10-05 05:30:35

STOCKHOLM (Reuters) - Frenchman Yves Chauvin and Americans Robert Grubbs and Richard Schrock won the 2005 Nobel Chemistry prize for work in organic chemistry, said the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences on Wednesday. They won the 10 million crown ($1.29 million) prize for work in metathesis, which enables the creation of new molecules for use in pharmaceuticals and environmentally-friendly production of chemicals and plastics.


Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
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