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Latest Robert S. Wilson Stories

Boost Memory By Reading And Writing
2013-07-04 09:54:45

Michael Harper for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Good news for those reading and writing this article: a new study from Rush University Medical Center in Chicago claims reading and writing may preserve memory into old age. By keeping your brain active, says study author Robert S. Wilson, PhD, you're able to slow the rate at which your memory decreases in later years. This is not the first time researchers have arrived at such a conclusion, of course. Previous studies have also...

2012-04-10 05:04:35

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- Pick up a book! Reading and writing now may contribute to prolonged memory retention and thinking abilities when you´re older. In the first of two recent studies conducted by Robert S. Wilson, PhD of Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, memory decline has been linked to the two-and-a-half years before death, and according to the second study, an active mind just may be the best means of prevention. Wilson´s first study was conducted on 174 individuals,...

2012-04-05 10:20:21

Keeping mentally fit through mental activities may help preserve memory Two new studies published in the April 4 online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, suggest that a person's memory declines at a faster rate in the last two-and-a-half years of life than at any other time after memory problems first begin. The second study shows that keeping mentally fit through board games or reading may be the best way to preserve memory during late life....

2012-04-05 09:22:39

New research finds that a person's memory declines at a faster rate in the two- and-a-half years before death than at any other time after memory problems first begin. A second study shows that keeping mentally fit through board games or reading may be the best way to preserve memory during late life. Both studies are published in the April 4, 2012, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. For the study, 174 Catholic priests, nuns and monks...

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2010-09-16 09:30:00

Old age and memory loss have long been anecdotally linked, but advancing in years may not actually be related to those so-called 'senior moments' that often plague the elderly, according to a new study published in the online journal Neurology on Wednesday. The study, which was completed by Rush University Medical Center neuropsychologist Robert S. Wilson, PhD, found that the same types of brain lesions that are typically associated with dementia and Alzheimer's disease could also be the...

2010-09-02 08:52:06

(Ivanhoe Newswire) -- You've heard that activities like completing crossword puzzles, reading a book and listening to the radio may protect your brain from dementia. Now, a new study shows those exercises may slow cognitive decline at first, but may speed it up later on. Researchers studied the mental activities of 1,157 participants aged 65 or older who did not have dementia at the start of the 12-year study. The participants answered questions about how often they participated in certain...

2010-07-06 12:29:59

Study suggests depression is a risk factor and not an early sign of Alzheimer's disease Depression is commonly reported in people with Alzheimer's disease and its precursor, mild cognitive impairment, with several studies suggesting having a history of major depression may nearly double your risk of developing dementia later in life. However, it has been unclear if depression is a symptom of the disease or a potential cause of the disease. To study the relationship between Alzheimer's and...

2010-03-23 11:44:41

No differences in decline among African American and white patients People with Alzheimer's disease experience a rate of cognitive decline four times greater than those with no cognitive impairment according to a new study by researchers at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago. The results of the study, which is only the second population-based study to quantify the rate of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease, are published in the March 23, 2010 issue of the journal Neurology, the...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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