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Last updated on April 18, 2014 at 21:21 EDT

Latest Robert Stevens Stories

2012-06-20 14:20:06

ARLINGTON, Va., June 20, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Lockheed Martin's [NYSE: LMT] Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Bob Stevens, President and Chief Operating Officer Chris Kubasik and other senior leaders commemorated the corporation's 100-year history during its annual media briefing yesterday, while simultaneously warning of the impacts that sequestration will have on the industry. The meeting, held at the company's Global Vision Center in Arlington, Va., was attended by seventy industry and...

2012-04-26 02:20:25

BETHESDA, Md., April 26, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- Lockheed Martin today announced that Chairman and CEO Bob Stevens, 60, informed the board of directors of his plans to retire as CEO after 25 years of service with the company. President and COO Chris Kubasik, 51, will succeed Stevens as CEO effective January 1, 2013. Subject to election by shareholders and approval by the board, Stevens will remain chairman through January 2014. (Photo:...

2009-05-29 13:25:35

The U.S. National Archives said a terse memo from Abraham Lincoln to his treasury secretary has been donated by a private collector. The memo, written four days before Lincoln traveled to Gettysburg in 1863, was written to Treasury Secretary Salmon Chase and concerned Robert Stevens, son of Lincoln friend Sen. Edward Baker, R-Ore., The Washington Post reported Friday. Stevens had been removed from his position as superintendent of the San Francisco Mint on corruption charges after an...

2008-08-07 09:00:04

By Lara Jakes Jordan and Matt Apuzzo Associated Press WASHINGTON -- The murder weapon was a flask. Army scientist Bruce Ivins was the anthrax killer whose mailings took five lives and rattled the nation in 2001, prosecutors asserted Wednesday, alleging he had in his lab a container of the lethal, highly purified spores involved and access to the distinctive envelopes used to mail them. Making its points against Ivins, a brilliant yet deeply troubled man who committed suicide last week,...

2008-08-07 06:00:03

By Donna Leinwand, Ken Dilanian, Steve Sternberg and Dan Vergano WASHINGTON -- On several nights before the anthrax attacks in September and October 2001, bioweapons scientist Bruce Ivins repeatedly spent long periods alone in a secure laboratory that housed a strain of the lethal bacteria. He later "could provide no legitimate reason" for his after-hours work to investigators, who used new DNA technology to match the specific strain of spores in Ivins' lab with the one used in the attacks....

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2008-08-05 12:00:00

Survivors of the 2001 anthrax attacks and relatives of those killed by the deadly powder said yesterday that they want a full accounting from the FBI of its investigation to date, and they are not yet convinced that Bruce Ivins, the government scientist who killed himself last week, was responsible. Federal authorities are expected to meet this week with the victims' families in Washington to discuss their investigation, after which the FBI could close its nearly seven-year-old anthrax case...

2008-08-02 15:00:02

MIAMI - Those who lived through the deadly 2001 anthrax mailings at a South Florida media company said yesterday's news that a government researcher suspected in the attacks had killed himself came as a surprise and relief. "I'm feeling a sense of relief that the madman who may have done this was finally identified and brought to some kind of justice," said Joseph West, a former Sun editor at American Media Inc. in Boca Raton, Fla. West used to sit across from Bob Stevens, a 63-year-old...

2008-08-02 00:00:02

By Rupert Cornwell A LEADING army microbiologist suspected of being behind the anthrax mailings in the US in autumn 2001 has apparently committed suicide, it emerged yesterday - just as federal prosecutors were preparing to bring capital charges against him for the attacks, which killed five people and infected 17 others. The death of Bruce Ivins, a 62-year-old research specialist at the government's biodefence laboratory in Maryland, 40 miles north of Washington, was first reported by...

2005-09-30 07:48:31

By Mark John BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Lockheed Martin Corp.'s chief executive acknowledged its $245 billion F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program could suffer from strains on the U.S. defense budget, but insisted the project's future was secure. The new jet, which the United States is developing with eight partner countries, is the country's most expensive arms program ever. Of the tentatively planned 2,400 U.S. aircraft, the U.S. Air Force would get around 1,700, the Marine Corps at least...

2005-09-30 04:30:00

By Mark John BRUSSELS (Reuters) - Lockheed Martin Corp.'s chief executive acknowledged its $245 billion F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program could suffer from strains on the U.S. defense budget, but insisted the project's future was secure. The new jet, which the United States is developing with eight partner countries, is the country's most expensive arms program ever. Of the tentatively planned 2,400 U.S. aircraft, the U.S. Air Force would get around 1,700, the Marine Corps at least 400 and...