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Latest Rochester Medical Center Stories

2010-09-24 13:42:32

Scientists Showcase Steps to Stop Unwanted Enlargement of the Heart Like a well-crafted football play designed to block the opposing team's offensive drive to the end zone, the body constantly executes complex "Ëœplays' or sequences of events to initiate, or block, different actions or functions. Scientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center recently discovered a potential molecular playbook for blocking cardiac hypertrophy, the unwanted enlargement of the heart and a...

2010-09-22 10:26:00

ROCHESTER, N.Y., Sept. 22 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- AstraZeneca purchased a one-year membership to gain access to an international repository of data designed to aid industry and academic researchers developing new technologies to improve cardiac safety. The database, called the Telemetric and Holter ECG Warehouse (THEW), helps researchers better evaluate how drugs affect the heart. Cardiac toxicity is one of the leading causes of removal of drugs from the market today, which is why...

2010-09-09 01:06:59

Removal of Key Protein Leads to Initiation of Disease Elimination of a molecular gatekeeper leads to the development of arthritis in mice, scientists report in a study published in The Journal of Experimental Medicine. The newly discovered gatekeeper is a protein that determines the fate "“ survival or death "“ of damaging cells that mistakenly attack the body's own tissues and lead to autoimmune disorders such as arthritis.  Better understanding how arthritis develops will...

2010-09-03 07:47:00

$11 Million Supports Five-Year Study to Compare Treatments ROCHESTER, N.Y., Sept. 3 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A large international study aimed at improving the care of muscular dystrophy patients worldwide is being launched by physicians, physical therapists, and researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Neurologist Robert "Berch" Griggs, M.D., is heading the study of treatments for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the most common form of the disease that affects children....

2010-08-19 16:27:00

ROCHESTER, N.Y., Aug. 19 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A drug to treat inflammation plays a surprising role reducing the level of infection caused by an opportunistic bug that is deadly for AIDS and cancer patients and others with weakened immune systems. The drug, sulfasalazine, spurs the body to get rid of the fungal evaders by enhancing the body's ability to chew them up instead of leaving the debris to litter the lungs, where it would continue to provoke an onslaught of harmful...

2010-08-19 15:12:00

LEIDEN, The Netherlands, Aug. 19 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Nearly two decades after they identified the specific genetic flaw that causes a common type of muscular dystrophy, scientists believe they have figured out how that flaw brings about the disease. The finding by an international team of researchers settles a longstanding question about the roots of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy or FSHD. The work is published in the August 20 issue of Science. Unraveling how the genetic...

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2010-08-05 12:29:15

As the medical community searches for better vaccines and ways to deliver them, a University of Rochester scientist believes he has discovered a new approach to boosting the body's response to vaccinations. Richard P. Phipps, Ph.D., found that the same molecules used in drugs that treat diabetes also stimulate B cells in the immune system, pushing them to make antibodies for protection against invading microorganisms. The University of Rochester Medical Center has applied for international...

2010-06-30 12:20:40

"ËœFounder' strain of close cousin of HIV still present months later Scientists have been surprised to learn that, despite thousands of changes that viruses like HIV undergo in rapid fashion to evade the body's immune system, the original version that caused the infection is still present in the body months later. The finding, published in the June issue of the Journal of Virology, is the result of an uncommonly detailed look at the cat-and-mouse action that takes place in an...

2010-06-25 16:13:01

We've all experienced the strong heartbeat that accompanies emotions such as fear and rage. But can the body's natural response to these emotions be used to combat heart failure? Results of a study published online today in the journal Circulation Research present a strong case. In the study, scientists from the University of Rochester Medical Center found that two experimental drugs have the potential to restore pumping strength to failing hearts in part by harnessing the fight-or-flight...

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2010-06-23 07:20:37

Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) have discovered yet another reason to filter the foreign white cells from donor blood: the resulting blood product is associated with dramatically fewer cardiopulmonary complications for patients who received a transfusion. The study is published online in the journal, Transfusion. It is the latest in a large body of work led by Neil Blumberg, M.D., who for 25 years has been investigating the benefits of filtering or washing...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
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