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Latest Rockefeller University Press Stories

2012-08-06 06:22:22

SEATTLE, Aug. 6, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- The Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), The Rockefeller University Press and Glencoe Software are pleased to announce their next enhancements to the JCB DataViewer, the world's first system for presentation, sharing and archiving published scientific image data. Starting today, the JCB DataViewer can accept and publish very large images, made up of many individual tiles, and make them viewable online. The first example of this type of image is like none other...

2011-12-08 13:34:00

NEW YORK, Dec. 8, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Rockefeller University Press (RUP) has unveiled new iPhone and iPad apps for its three journals: The Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), The Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), and The Journal of General Physiology (JGP). iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch users can read full-text articles anywhere at any time, even without an Internet connection. The apps, designed for easy reading and browsing on any iOS device, allow users to read and cache...

2011-09-07 06:35:00

SEATTLE, Sept. 7, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- The Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), The Rockefeller University Press and Glencoe Software are pleased to announce their next enhancement to the JCB DataViewer, the world's first system for sharing and archiving published scientific image data. Starting today, data from genome-wide high-content screens (HCS) can be published online, directly associated with papers published in JCB. HCS data are increasingly used to determine the effects of systematic...

2011-02-28 15:35:47

A small difference in DNA sequence predicts the degree of disability after a stroke, according to a paper published online on February 28 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (www.jem.org). Stroke, the consequence of disturbed blood flow to the brain, can impair speech, movement and vision, but it is currently difficult for clinicians to predict the severity of these side effects or the long-term prognosis. Strokes result in the death of brain cells called neurons. Angeles Almeida and...

2010-10-06 07:15:00

SEATTLE, Oct. 6 /PRNewswire/ -- Glencoe Software, Inc., The Journal of Cell Biology (JCB) and The Rockefeller University Press are pleased to announce the release of the next version of the JCB DataViewer, the world's first scientific image data publication system. First released in Dec. 2008, the JCB DataViewer (http://jcb-dataviewer.rupress.org) has been under continuous development to support new image data formats and provide new functionality for its users. Now, for the first time,...

2010-09-27 17:36:54

Intestinal worms sidestep the immune system by inducing the development of suppressive T cells, according to a study published on September 27th in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (www.jem.org). Immune T cells are essential for the clearance of invading microbes, including intestinal worms, but turning off immune responses is essential for avoiding collateral tissue destruction. This job falls in part to a population of suppressive T cells called regulatory T (T reg) cells. A team of...

2010-09-20 22:22:02

NKX3.1, a protein that suppresses the development of prostate tumors, promotes the growth of a different type of tumor in the blood, according to an article published online on September 20 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (www.jem.org). Paul-Henri Romeo and colleagues find that TAL1, a protein abundantly expressed in approximately 40% of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), drives expression of NKX3.1. Eliminating NKX3.1 halted the growth of TAL1-expressing T-ALL...

2010-09-07 13:04:58

Like some people, cells eat when they are under pressure"”but they consume parts of themselves. A multi-function protein helps control this form of cannibalism, according to a study in the September 6 issue of the Journal of Cell Biology (www.jcb.org). Cells often respond to hunger or stress by digesting some of their contents. The process, known as autophagy, helps free nutrients and clean up cytoplasmic trash such as worn-out organelles and misshapen proteins. A team led by...

2010-07-27 01:19:09

The latest Perspectives in General Physiology series introduces the newest technologies in the field of calcium signaling, which plays a central role in many cellular processes. The Perspectives appear in the August issue of the Journal of General Physiology (www.jgp.org). A revolution in measuring Ca2+ signals has taken place over the last decade, benefiting from advances in microscopy, buffers/dyes, and other technologies. This means researchers now have the tools to answer questions about...

2010-07-06 12:05:04

Antibody-producing B cells promote atherosclerosis in mice, according to a study to be published online on July 5th in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (www.jem.org) These findings came as a surprise, as prior studies had suggested that B cells help protect against the disease. An international team of researchers, led by Ziad Mallat of the Paris Cardiovascular Research Center and the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine at the University of Cambridge, found that getting rid of B cells...