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Latest Rockefeller University Stories

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2009-07-10 09:45:00

Telomeres, the repetitive sequences of DNA at the ends of linear chromosomes, have an important function: They protect vulnerable chromosome ends from molecular attack. Researchers at Rockefeller University now show that telomeres have their own weakness. They resemble unstable parts of the genome called fragile sites where DNA replication can stall and go awry. But what keeps our fragile telomeres from falling apart is a protein that ensures the smooth progression of DNA replication to the...

2009-06-25 11:45:26

In the bustling economy of the cell, little bubbles called vesicles serve as container ships, ferrying cargo to and from the port - the cell membrane. Some of these vesicles, called post-Golgi vesicles, export cargo made by the cell's protein factory. Scientists have long believed that other, similar vesicles handle the reverse function, importing life-supporting nutrients and proteins through an independent process. By using a finely honed type of microscopy to more precisely examine these...

2009-06-17 10:00:00

NEW YORK, June 17 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Fisher Center for Alzheimer's Research Foundation today announced it is moving forward with an online campaign to help fund new discoveries into Alzheimer's disease. The campaign, titled, "Turn Up the Heat on Alzheimer's" has a set goal to raise funds and awareness for Nobel laureate Dr. Paul Greengard's research laboratory in The Rockefeller University, during summer 2009 to help fund Alzheimer's disease research. This fundraising campaign...

2009-06-08 08:30:24

Similar architecture of an essential nuclear pore complex module and cell's vesicle coats supports common evolutionary originThe genome of complex organisms is stashed away inside each cell's nucleus, a little like a sovereign shielded from the threatening world outside. The genome cannot govern from its protective chamber, however, without knowing what's going on in the realm beyond and having the ability to project power there. Guarding access to the nuclear chamber is the job of large,...

2009-06-07 12:33:20

Similar architecture of an essential nuclear pore complex module and cell's vesicle coats supports common evolutionary origin The genome of complex organisms is stashed away inside each cell's nucleus, a little like a sovereign shielded from the threatening world outside. The genome cannot govern from its protective chamber, however, without knowing what's going on in the realm beyond and having the ability to project power there. Guarding access to the nuclear chamber is the job of large,...

2009-06-03 08:40:00

An intervention to relieve toxic stress that children experience early in life could not only affect their well-being and longevity but also improve societal health overall, researchers reportThe origins of many adult diseases can be traced to early negative experiences associated with social class and other markers of disadvantage. Confronting the causes of adversity before and shortly after birth may be a promising way to improve adult health and reduce premature deaths, researchers argue...

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2009-04-24 15:49:55

Three immune system researchers were awarded the nation's richest prize in medicine and biomedical research on Friday for their work that led to new treatments for rheumatoid arthritis and diabetes, the Associated Press reported. Dr. Ralph Steinman of Rockefeller University, Dr. Charles Dinarello, of the University of Colorado, and Dr. Bruce Beutler, of The Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif. will share the $500,000 Albany Medical Center Prize the largest medicine or science award...

2009-04-17 11:19:55

The discovery of a new nucleotide in the mouse brain opens the door to a new domain of epigenetic DNA modificationAnyone who studied a little genetics in high school has heard of adenine, thymine, guanine and cytosine "“ the A,T,G and C that make up the DNA code. But those are not the whole story. The rise of epigenetics in the past decade has drawn attention to a fifth nucleotide, 5-methylcytosine (5-mC), that sometimes replaces cytosine in the famous DNA double helix to regulate which...

2009-04-16 07:39:43

Double-stranded DNA breaks are the key to Trypanosoma brucei's getaway planThe parasite Trypanosoma brucei, which causes African sleeping sickness, is like a thief donning a disguise. Every time the host's immune cells get close to destroying the parasite, it escapes detection by rearranging its DNA and changing its appearance. Now, in research to appear in the advance online April 15 issue of Nature, two laboratories at Rockefeller University have joined forces to reveal how the parasite...

2009-04-04 10:09:59

Ask a simple question, get a simple answer: When Abraham Lincoln was asked how long a man's legs should be, he absurdly replied, "Long enough to reach the ground." Now, by using a new microscopy technique to watch the growth of individual neurons in the microscopic roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, Rockefeller University researchers are turning another deceptively simple question on its head. They asked, "How long should a worm's neurons be?" And the worms fired back, "Long enough to reach...


Word of the Day
callithump
  • A somewhat riotous parade, accompanied with the blowing of tin horns, and other discordant noises; also, a burlesque serenade; a charivari.
'Callithump' is a back-formation of 'callithumpian,' a 'fanciful formation' according to the Oxford English Dictionary. However, the English Dialect Dictionary, says 'Gallithumpians' is a Dorset and Devon word from the 1790s that refers to 'a society of radical social reformers' or 'noisy disturbers of elections and meetings.'
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