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Latest Roger Tsien Stories

2012-01-25 14:38:00

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have created a new generation of fast-acting fluorescent dyes that optically highlight electrical activity in neuronal membranes. The work is published in this week's online Early Edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The ability to visualize these small, fast-changing voltage differences between the interior and exterior of neurons — known as transmembrane potential — is...

2011-04-06 11:09:31

UCSD scientists modify plant protein to provide a way to see the previously unseen Modifying a protein from a plant much favored by science, researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and colleagues have created a new type of genetic tag visible under an electron microscope, illuminating life in never-before-seen detail. Led by Nobel laureate Roger Tsien, PhD, Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and UCSD professor of pharmacology, chemistry and...

2010-02-17 08:56:19

Use of biological probes improve detection and survival in mice Building on his Nobel Prize-winning work creating fluorescent proteins that light up the inner workings of cells, a team of researchers led by Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator Roger Tsien, PhD, professor of pharmacology, chemistry and biochemistry at the University of California, San Diego and the Moores UCSD Cancer Center has developed biological probes that can stick to and light up tumors in mice. The scientists...

2009-05-08 09:20:02

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego "“ led by 2008 Nobel-Prize winner Roger Tsien, PhD "“ have shown that bacterial proteins called phytochromes can be engineered into infrared-fluorescent proteins (IFPs). Because the wavelength of IFPs is able to penetrate tissue, these proteins are suitable for whole-body imaging in small animals. Their findings will be published in the May 8 edition of the journal Science."The development of IFPs may be important for future...

2008-10-09 21:00:19

Osamu Shimomura of Japan and Americans Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien were honoured for their work on green fluorescent protein, or GFP.Researchers worldwide now use GFP to track such processes as the development of brain cells, the growth of tumours and the spread of cancer cells.It has let them study nerve cell damage from Alzheimer's disease and see how insulin-producing beta cells arise in the pancreas of a growing embryo, for example.The academy compared the impact on science to the...

2008-10-09 09:00:15

By MALCOLM RITTER By Malcolm Ritter The Associated Press NEW YORK Three U.S.-based scientists won a Nobel Prize on Wednesday for turning a glowing green protein from jellyfish into a revolutionary way to watch the tiniest details of life within cells and living creatures. Osamu Shimomura, a Japanese citizen who works in the United States, and Americans Martin Chalfie and Roger Tsien shared the chemistry prize for discovering and developing green fluorescent protein, or GFP. When...

2008-10-09 06:00:18

By Kenneth Chang One Japanese and two American scientists have received the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for taking the ability of some jellyfish to glow green and transforming it into a ubiquitous tool of molecular biology to watch the dance of living cells and the proteins within them. The new laureates are Osamu Shimomura, a Japanese-born emeritus professor at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, and Boston University Medical School; Martin Chalfie, a...

2008-10-09 06:00:18

By Dan Vergano Glowing jellyfish have lit the way to 2008's Nobel Prize in chemistry for one Japanese and two American researchers, pioneers in illuminating biological processes inside cells and behind diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer's. Osamu Shimomura, 80, of the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.; Martin Chalfie, 61, of Columbia University in New York; and Roger Tsien, 56, of the University of California-San Diego will split the $1.4 million prize, the Royal...

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2008-10-08 13:05:00

Two Americans and one Japanese researcher were awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for the discovery and development of a brightly glowing protein first seen in jellyfish, which has helped scientists understand how cancer cells spread. American researchers Martin Chalfie of Columbia University in New York and Roger Tsien of the University of California, San Diego and Japanese-born Osamu Shimomura now of the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory in Massachusetts received...


Word of the Day
call-note
  • The call or cry of a bird or other animal to its mate or its young.
'Call-note' is newer than 'bird-call,' which originally referred to 'an instrument for imitating the note of birds' but now also refers to 'the song or cry of a bird.'
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