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Latest Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Stories

Effects Of Changing Ocean pH May Result In Increase In The Hearing Sensitivity Of Fish
2013-04-19 14:26:57

University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science Ocean acidification, which occurs as CO2 is absorbed by the world's oceans, is known to negatively impact a wide variety of marine animals ranging from massive corals to microscopic plankton. However, there is much less information about how fish may be impacted by acidification, should carbon emissions continue to rise as a result of human activities. In a new study published in the Proceedings of the National...

2013-01-17 23:01:08

Suffolk Construction, one of the leading privately held construction management firms in the country, recently attended the Topping Out ceremony of their latest project, the Rosenstiel School of Marine Technology and Life Sciences Seawater Complex, at the University of Miami. Miami, FL (PRWEB) January 17, 2013 Suffolk Construction, the University of Miami and community leaders, gathered to celebrate the milestone Topping Out ceremony for the new Marine Technology Life Sciences Seawater...

Subsea Injection Of Chemicals Didn't Prevent Oil From Rising To Sea Surface Suggested By Study
2012-12-05 14:00:11

University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science Groundbreaking 3D models show that oil droplets were too small for dispersants to have significant impact The 2010 blowout of the Macondo well in the waters of the Gulf of Mexico resulted in the region's largest oil spill in U.S. history. As the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) incident unfolded, in an effort to prevent the oil from coming to the surface and reaching coastal and marsh ecosystems, chemical dispersants were...

Coral Can Have Too Much Of A Good Thing
2012-10-15 04:54:29

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While the single-celled algae that live inside corals typically play a vital role in keeping the reefs healthy, a new study suggests that an overabundance of the symbiotic organisms could have a negative effect on them. According to scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science, these algal symbionts provide corals with the energy needed to build larger reef frameworks. When...

Winds Played Important Role In Keeping Oil Away From South Florida
2012-07-09 16:41:40

New NSF funded study shows how currents and winds shaped where hydrocarbons from Deepwater Horizon went The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in spring 2010 is the largest oil spill in the history of the United States, with more than 200 million gallons of crude oil released at about 1,500 m. depth off the Mississippi Delta in the Gulf of Mexico. At the time of the accident, the proximity of the intense Loop Current, flowing from the Yucatan Channel to the Florida Straits, raised major concerns...

Study Shows Adaptive Capacity Of Reef Corals To Climate Change May Be Widespread
2012-04-12 07:42:53

Global survey of corals using high sensitivity genetic analysis shows many species can host multiple symbionts. A new study by scientists at the University of Miami's Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science suggests that many species of reef-building corals may be able to adapt to warming waters by relying on their closest aquatic partners - algae. The corals' ability to host a variety of algal types, each with different sensitivities to environmental stress, could offer a...

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2012-03-14 10:37:41

Mathematical methods help predict movement of oil and ash following environmental disasters When oil started gushing into the Gulf of Mexico in late April 2010, friends asked George Haller whether he was tracking its movement. That's because the McGill engineering professor has been working for years on ways to better understand patterns in the seemingly chaotic motion of oceans and air. Meanwhile, colleagues of Josefina Olascoaga in Miami were asking the geophysicist a similar question....

2012-03-12 20:28:42

Mathematical methods help predict movement of oil and ash following environmental disasters When oil started gushing into the Gulf of Mexico in late April 2010, friends asked George Haller whether he was tracking its movement. That's because the McGill engineering professor has been working for years on ways to better understand patterns in the seemingly chaotic motion of oceans and air. Meanwhile, colleagues of Josefina Olascoaga in Miami were asking the geophysicist a similar question....

Dust Linked To Increased Glacier Melting, Ocean Productivity
2012-03-04 05:37:41

[ Watch the Video ] Researchers analyze dust concentrations and their effects off southern Iceland A University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science-led study shows a link between large dust storms on Iceland and glacial melting. The dust is both accelerating glacial melting and contributing important nutrients to the surrounding North Atlantic Ocean. The results provide new insights on the role of dust in climate change and high-latitude ocean ecosystems....

Novel Study Sheds Light On Early Life Of Prolific Predator
2011-12-17 04:46:16

University of Miami team sinks teeth into larval life of barracuda, sennets For anglers and boaters who regularly travel the coasts of Florida the great barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda) is a common sight. Surprisingly, however, very little is known about the early life stage of this ecologically and socio-economically important coastal fish. In the journal Marine Biology, lead author Dr. Evan D'Alessandro and University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science...


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