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Latest Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science Stories

Novel Study Sheds Light On Early Life Of Prolific Predator
2011-12-17 04:46:16

University of Miami team sinks teeth into larval life of barracuda, sennets For anglers and boaters who regularly travel the coasts of Florida the great barracuda (Sphyraena barracuda) is a common sight. Surprisingly, however, very little is known about the early life stage of this ecologically and socio-economically important coastal fish. In the journal Marine Biology, lead author Dr. Evan D'Alessandro and University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science...

Image 1 - Rethinking The Ocean's Role In Pacific Climate
2011-11-16 03:29:59

The new study can aid scientists in better understanding regional and global effects of climate change in the Pacific University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science researchers have climate scientists rethinking a commonly held theory about the ocean's role in the global climate system. The new findings can aid scientists in better understanding and predicting changes in the Pacific climate and its impacts around the globe. According to the study's lead...

2011-09-09 14:40:40

Scientists at the University of Miami's (UM's) Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science have found an intriguing relationship between hurricane tracks and climate variability. Angela Colbert, a graduate student in Meteorology & Physical Oceanography, with the collaboration of Professor and Associate Dean for Professional Masters, Dr. Brian Soden, studied data from the Atlantic gathered between 1950-2010, unlocking some noteworthy results, which appear in the American...

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2011-08-28 04:31:18

  The record-breaking cold weather experienced in Florida last year resulted in large losses among coral reef species, researchers from the University of Miami have discovered. Reporting in this month's edition of the journal PLoS One, scientists at the school's Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science discovered a "catastrophic loss of corals within the Florida Reef Tract, which spans 160 miles (260 kilometers) from Miami to the Dry Tortugas and is the only living...

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2011-08-04 09:26:49

Tracking urban atmospheric plumes using isotopic signatures of vehicle emissions Scientists at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science have discovered a technique to track urban atmospheric plumes thanks to a unique isotopic signature found in vehicle emissions. Brian Giebel, a Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry graduate student working with Drs. Daniel Riemer and Peter Swart discovered that ethanol mixed in vehicle fuel is not completely burned, and that...

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2011-05-30 12:46:25

According to new findings, seas off Papua New Guinea suggest that acidifying oceans will severely hit coral reefs by the end of the century. Carbon dioxide bubbles into the water from the slopes of a dormant volcano there, making it more acidic. Coral is badly affected and not growing at all in the CO2-rich zone. The scientists say this "lab" mimics conditions that will be widespread if CO2 emissions continue. The oceans absorb some of the carbon dioxide that human activities are putting...

2011-05-03 13:38:38

Paper provides results from first microbial subsurface observatory experiment An international team of scientists report on the first observatory experiment to study the dynamic microbial life of an ever-changing environment inside Earth's crust. University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science professor Keir Becker contributed the deep-sea technology required to make long-term scientific observations of life beneath the seafloor. During the four-year subsurface...

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2011-04-08 09:42:28

University of Miami scientists using the geologic record of corals to understand how reef ecosystems might respond to climate changeClimate change is already widely recognized to be negatively affecting coral reef ecosystems around the world, yet the long-term effects are difficult to predict. University of Miami (UM) scientists are using the geologic record of Caribbean corals to understand how reef ecosystems might respond to climate change expected for this century. The findings are...

2011-03-21 23:48:56

Study establishes proven ecosystem-wide framework for monitoring coral reef fisheries that can be used on global scale Marine biologists have solved a conundrum that has stumped them for years "“ how to count reef fish. It may sound simple, but the task is actually complex and critical in helping to evaluate the state of our oceans, coral reefs and the marine life that populate them. In an article published in the journal Fisheries Research scientists from the University of Miami (UM)...

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2011-03-20 06:44:28

Research can help assess impacts of climate change, other threats to coral reef ecosystems University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science scientist Chris Langdon and colleagues developed a new tool to monitor coral reef vital signs. By accurately measuring their biological pulse, scientists can better assess how climate change and other ecological threats impact coral reef health worldwide. During a March 2009 experiment at Cayo Enrique Reef in Puerto Rico, the...


Word of the Day
jument
  • A beast of burden; also, a beast in general.
'Jument' ultimately comes from the Latin 'jugum,' yoke.
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