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Latest Rotifer Stories

Carnivorous Pitcher Plants Play Host To Complex Food Web
2013-04-03 09:00:17

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online At first glance, pitcher plants appear to be simple carnivorous plants that entrap and digest hapless insects that fall into them. However, a closer look reveals a complex food web of fly larvae, rotifers, midge larvae, and bacteria that exist within the plants´ pitcher. According to a new study by Harvard University, the predator-prey interactions among pitcher plant inhabitants provide an ideal model for understanding food webs...

Clean-Up Makes Gulf Spill More Toxic
2012-12-01 10:57:06

April Flowers for redOrbit.com — Your Universe Online In 2010, British Petroleum's Deepwater Horizon offshore oilrig spilled 4.9 billion gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico, creating an ecological disaster. A new study from the Georgia Institute of Technology and the Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes (UAA) reveals that the two million gallons of dispersant used to clean it up is even worse — 52 times more toxic than the oil alone. The research team, using oil from...

2010-10-14 15:08:22

University of Toronto biologists identify influence of environment on sexual vs. asexual reproduction Evolutionary biologists at the University of Toronto (U of T) have found that environment plays a key role in determining whether a species opts for sexual over asexual reproduction. The study, led by post-doctoral student Lutz Becks and Professor Aneil Agrawal of the Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, found that species that inhabit spatially heterogenous environments "“...

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2008-05-29 17:54:06

MBL, WOODS HOLE, MA"”Where do you get your genes? If you are an animal, you inherit them from your parents at the moment of conception, and that's about it. No later incorporation of environmental DNA for you, unless you become host to a parasite or an endosymbiont that somehow transfers bits of its genome into yours (which is a rarely documented event). Unless you are a bdelloid rotifer, that is. This odd, microscopic, freshwater animal is making news once again, this time for the...

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2008-04-02 17:05:00

Birds and bees may do it, but the microscopic animals called bdelloid rotifers seem to get along just fine without sex, thank you. What's more, they have done so over millions of years of evolution, resulting in at least 370 species. These hardy creatures somehow escape the usual drawback of asexuality "“ extinction "“ and the Marine Biological Laboratory's (MBL) David Mark Welch, Matthew Meselson, and their colleagues are finding out how.In two related papers published this week...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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