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Latest Rotman Stories

2013-02-12 14:41:46

NBA player stats used to study on-the-job adaptability If an employee's performance drops in one area, does that mean they're slacking off? It could mean that they've simply shifted and refocused their efforts on a different set of tasks -- a positive sign of adaptability that should be considered in performance evaluations,  says a study lead by a researcher at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management. The study, published in Human Performance, draws on...

2012-05-08 15:31:39

They have been stereotyped as a “model minority.” But when they don´t conform to common racial stereotypes, such as being non-dominant, even people of East Asian descent are “unwelcome and unwanted by their co-workers,” says a new paper from the University of Toronto´s Rotman School of Management. The study shows there is a difference between “descriptive” racial stereotypes — what people believe to be true about members of a...

2012-05-02 20:03:26

It´s called the gift of life. But more people will roll up their sleeves to donate blood if a gift card comes with it. That´s according to a new study from the University of Toronto. It shows a 15 to 20 percent rise in blood drive donations when incentives such as T-shirts, jackets, coupons or gift cards are thrown into the mix. “It´s a pretty remarkable increase,” says Nicola Lacetera, an assistant professor of strategic management at the University of...

2012-03-09 00:25:16

Countries that more strictly uphold their cultural norms are less likely to promote women as leaders — unless those norms support equal opportunity for both sexes, shows a new paper from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management. "Cultural tightness can prevent the emergence of women leaders because tighter cultures may make a society's people more resistant to changing the traditionally-held practice that placed men in leadership roles," says Prof. Soo Min Toh, who is...

2012-02-06 20:33:02

What does "free time" mean to you? When you're not at work, do you pass the time -- or spend it? The difference may impact how happy you are. A new study shows people who put a price on their time are more likely to feel impatient when they're not using it to earn money. And that hurts their ability to derive happiness during leisure activities. Treating time as money can actually undermine your well-being," says Sanford DeVoe, one of two researchers at the University of Toronto's...

2011-05-31 16:15:00

Not allowed to advertise your booze or smokes on a billboard? That's okay. Research shows online advertising works especially well in places with government ad bans. "If you want to regulate the offline world, you have to remember that people have access online too and you have to think about how that online world is going to mitigate the effects of your regulation," says Avi Goldfarb, a marketing professor at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management who co-wrote a study on the...

2011-05-16 15:31:35

Why isn't knowledge transfer happening more often in companies spending money on it? Maybe it's because their staff don't always want to share. "We've had years of research in organizations about the benefits of knowledge-sharing but an important issue is the fact that people don't necessarily want to share their knowledge," says David Zweig, a professor of organizational behavior and human resources management at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management and the University of...

2011-03-14 14:57:11

Improved financial reporting at private firms benefits not only potential outside investors but will help the firm make better business decisions for itself too, says a new study. The study is authored by Ole-Kristian Hope, the Deloitte Professor of Accounting and an associate professor of accounting at the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto, uses World Bank data on small private firms in 21 emerging market countries "“ Thailand, Brazil and Pakistan having the...


Word of the Day
penuche
  • A fudgelike confection of brown sugar, cream or milk, and chopped nuts.
'Penuche' is a variant of 'panocha,' a coarse grade of sugar made in Mexico. 'Panocha' probably comes from the Spanish 'panoja, panocha,' ear of grain.
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