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Latest Royal College of Physicians Stories

Britons Asked To Take Two Days Off Of Drinking Per Week
2012-01-09 11:15:28

The Science and Technology Committee of British Members of Parliament have called for Britons to refrain from consuming alcohol for at least two days of the week and consider their own weight when deciding to heavily imbibe, reports Keith Weir for Reuters. The Royal College of Physicians warned the risk of liver disease, alcohol dependence and suggested drinkers be given a ℠binge drinking limit´ — the most they should drink daily. Current guidelines, introduced in 1987,...

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2009-07-03 16:45:00

New British research suggests that men who consumer just four pints of beer per week may increase their lifetime risk of being hospitalized.In the study of 5,772 Scottish men, researchers found that those who consumed just four pints of beer, eight shots of spirits or eight small glasses of wine per week were more likely to be admitted to a hospital, than those who drank less or nothing at all. The risks were even higher for men who consumed greater amounts of alcohol, the study found.The men...

2004-11-30 03:00:07

Medical Correspondent Dr Muiris Houston looks at the changing face of Irish medicine "The medical profession did not want any state control of medical services because it felt that it would destroy the doctor - patient relationship." - Dr Leonard Abrahamson, president of the Royal College of Physicians. "The extraordinary animus against the Custom House (the Department of Local Government and Health) and the people in it - everything we did or tried to do was met with suspicion and...


Word of the Day
sough
  • A murmuring sound; a rushing or whistling sound, like that of the wind; a deep sigh.
  • A gentle breeze; a waft; a breath.
  • Any rumor that engages general attention.
  • A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying; the chant or recitative characteristic of the old Presbyterians in Scotland.
  • To make a rushing, whistling, or sighing sound; emit a hollow murmur; murmur or sigh like the wind.
  • To breathe in or as in sleep.
  • To utter in a whining or monotonous tone.
According to the OED, from the 16th century, this word is 'almost exclusively Scots and northern dialect until adopted in general literary use in the 19th.'
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