Quantcast

Latest Salamander Stories

Do Salamanders Hold The Key To Limb Regeneration?
2014-06-20 03:50:11

University College London The secret of how salamanders successfully regrow body parts is being unraveled by UCL researchers in a bid to apply it to humans. For the first time, researchers have found that the 'ERK pathway' must be constantly active for salamander cells to be reprogrammed, and hence able to contribute to the regeneration of different body parts. The team identified a key difference between the activity of this pathway in salamanders and mammals, which helps us to...

Climate Change Robs Frogs And Salamanders Of Refuge
2014-05-02 03:41:38

Sandra Hines / Lisa Hayward US Geological Survey By hightailing it to nearby ponds and shallow waterways, frogs and salamanders have – until now – had a way to evade exotic trout introduced to the West's high-mountain lakes for recreational fishing. A warming climate, however, will dry up some of the places where amphibians and their young have found refuge. Researchers in the May 1 issue of Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment write about this challenge and a novel combination...

2014-04-30 12:13:02

Finding raises hope for new therapies for people with heart damage Imagine filling a hole in your heart by regrowing the tissue. While that possibility is still being explored in people, it is a reality in salamanders. A recent discovery that newt hearts can regenerate may pave the way to new therapies in people who need to have damaged tissue replaced with healthy tissue. Heart disease is the leading cause of deaths in the United States. Preventative measures like healthful diets and...

Climate Change May Be Shrinking Salamanders
2014-03-26 10:53:08

[ Watch the Video: Salamanders Shrinking Due to Climate Change ] Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online New research from a team of American scientists has found that salamanders living in the Appalachian Mountains have been getting smaller and smaller over the last 55 years as climate change gradually makes their habitat warmer and drier. Published in the journal Global Change Biology, the new study was based on the examination of museum specimen salamanders collected...

2014-03-25 23:03:26

Smaller Body Size Is One of the Fastest Environmental Changes Ever Seen, University of Maryland-led Research Team Says (PRWEB) March 25, 2014 Wild salamanders living in some of North America’s best salamander habitat are getting smaller as their surroundings get warmer and drier, forcing them to burn more energy in a changing climate. That’s the key finding of a new study, published March 25 in the journal Global Change Biology, that examined museum specimens caught in the...

Carbon Capture Increased From Predation On Invertebrates By Woodland Salamanders
2014-03-11 09:17:59

USDA Forest Service - Pacific Southwest Research Station Woodland salamanders perform a vital ecological service in American forests by helping to mitigate the impacts of global warming. Global warming occurs when greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide are released into the atmosphere. Woodland salamanders facilitate the capture of this carbon before it is released by feeding on invertebrates (beetles, earthworms, snails, ants, etc.) that would otherwise release carbon through...

Population Size Of Salamanders Helps Predict Forest Ecosystems Health, Inform Forest Management Decisions
2014-01-23 08:09:00

Jeff Sossamon - University of Missouri Researchers suggest a balance between timber harvest and conservation biology Woodland salamanders are small, lungless amphibians that live in moist, forest habitats throughout the US and the world. Salamanders often serve as vital links in forest food chains; their population size and recovery from major disturbances can help predict the health of forest ecosystems. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have determined that...

Salamander Jump Analysis Reveals Unexpected Twist
2014-01-22 15:45:14

Northern Arizona University A small, secretive creature with unlikely qualifications for defying gravity may hold the answer to an entirely new way of getting off the ground. Salamanders—or at least several species of the Plethodontidae family—can jump, and humans would like to know a lot more about it. “This particular jump is unique in the world,” said graduate researcher Anthony Hessel. “That’s why I think a lot of people are finding this very interesting.” The...

Study Shows Impact Of Polyandry On Reproductive Success In Fire Salamanders
2013-12-02 16:11:27

University of Bielefeld Researchers at Bielefeld University and the Technische Universität Braunschweig are the first to confirm the benefit of multiple paternities for a vertebrate under completely natural conditions. Together with their team, Dr. Barbara Caspers and Dr. Sebastian Steinfartz have shown that female fire salamanders mate with several males under natural conditions (so-called polyandry). This grants them fitness-relevant benefits by increasing their number of offspring. The...

2013-11-21 13:05:17

Scientists at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that two separate species of salamander differ in the way their muscles grow back in lost body parts. Their findings on the species-specific solutions, published in the scientific periodical Cell Stem Cell, demonstrate there is more than one mechanism of tissue regeneration. To carry out their study, the scientists labelled different cell types in two species of salamander in order to ascertain what kinds of cell give rise to...


Latest Salamander Reference Libraries

Hellbender Salamander, Cryptoranchus alleganiensis
2014-05-26 09:58:06

The hellbender salamander (Cryptoranchus alleganiensis), also known as the hellbender, is a species of giant salamander that can be found in eastern areas of North America. Its range includes the states of Ohio, Maryland, Virginia, Tennessee, Alabama, Arkansas, and some areas of Kansas and Oklahoma. This species is the sole member of its genus, Cryptobranchus, and is one of three living giant salamanders. The origin of the name hellbender is unknown and the species is locally known by many...

Jefferson Salamander, Ambystoma jeffersonianum
2014-05-26 08:49:45

The Jefferson salamander (Ambystoma jeffersonianum) is a species of mole salamander that can be found in northeastern areas of the United States, southwestern areas of Quebec, and central and southern areas of Ontario. This species prefers to reside in deciduous forests. It was named after Jefferson College, which is located in Pennsylvania. This species reaches an average body length between 4.3 inches and 7 inches and can be black, gray, or brown in color with lighter coloring on its front...

California slender salamander, Batrachoseps attenuatus
2014-02-04 09:23:14

The California slender salamander (Batrachoseps attenuatus) is a member of the Plethodontidae family of salamander species. The species is native to California and southwest Oregon. The California slender salamander ranges from central California, north along the coast and ranges into Oregon and in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada mountains. The California slender salamander grows to lengths between 3 to 5.5 inches. As its name implies, a slim body with short limbs gives this salamander...

California giant salamander, Dicamptodon ensatus
2014-02-04 09:07:49

The California giant salamander (Dicamptodon ensatus) is a member of the Dicamptodontidae family. The species is native only to northern California. The California giant salamander inhabits moist, coastal forests or streams, lakes and ponds. Some of the species may remain gilled aquatic creatures, while others transform and become terrestrial land creatures. The California giant is nocturnal and most of its life is spent hiding and burrowing. Typically, the California giant salamander...

The Axolotl, Ambystoma mexicanum
2014-02-03 08:59:54

Axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) may also be referred to as the Mexican salamander or the Mexican walking fish. The Axolotl is a member of the Ambystomatidae family and although its common name may suggest it is a fish, it is an amphibian. Axolotl are found exclusively in Mexico. The species situates, near Mexico City, on the bottom of Xochimilco’s lakes. Unlike most salamanders, Axolotl keep its larval features throughout its entire life and very rarely ever emerge from water. A condition...

More Articles (19 articles) »
Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
Related