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Latest San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth Stories

Arizona Earthquakes Not As Rare As Once Thought
2012-08-15 08:40:27

April Flowers for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online Earthquakes are a scary phenomenon. They are enormously destructive and much more common than you might think. Several million earthquakes are estimated to occur worldwide each year. Most are too small to feel, but they can be measured by arrays of seismometers. Some are so large they claim hundreds of thousands of lives (Shaanxi China, 1556, claimed 830,000 lives) while some create massive economic hardship (San Francisco, USA,...

earthquake
2011-08-29 08:23:39

  Scientists hope findings bring them closer to earthquake forecasting "What do I remember about an earthquake? I was in the 7th grade. All of a sudden the floor just started shaking. Desks were falling over. Kids were falling on the ground. It was so scary. It happened so quickly!" For people like Tony Zurnick, part of growing up in California was getting caught off guard by the sudden rumbles of earthquakes. Anyone who has lived through a major earthquake will tell you they'd...

f44d3dcffe1d11cfe673fe6a5ae07344
2011-05-10 09:38:23

Primary coordination point for EarthScope science, education and outreach activities The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded $2.4 million to Arizona State University (ASU) to serve as the next host for the EarthScope National Office. The national office fosters and supports integrated science, education and outreach, and related activities for EarthScope scientists. EarthScope is an NSF-funded Earth science program that explores the four-dimensional structure of the North American...

2010-06-25 14:44:31

California's San Andreas fault is notorious for repeatedly generating major earthquakes and for being on the brink of producing the next "big one" in a heavily populated area. But the famously violent fault also has quieter sections, where rocks easily slide against each other without giving rise to damaging quakes. The relatively smooth movement, called creep, happens because the fault creates its own lubricants---slippery clays that form ultra-thin coatings on rock fragments, geologist Ben...

2009-01-09 08:50:00

Priceless treasure from the bottom of the sea is locked away at Texas A&M University, stacked on floor-to-ceiling racks and kept secure in 15,000 square feet of refrigerated space. Although it's not gold bullion or precious gems, this treasure dazzles oceanographers, geologists, geophysicists and other geoscientists who come from around the world to College Station to sample it. One piece is even on permanent display at the Smithsonian.The treasure is a library of more than 106 kilometers...

2005-08-06 15:13:48

The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) reached a significant goal on Aug. 2 when scientists drilled into a seismically active section of the fault approximately two miles below the surface of the Earth. "This is a milestone for SAFOD," says Mark Zoback, a professor of geophysics at Stanford University. "For the first time, scientists have drilled directly into the San Andreas Fault Zone at a depth that will allow us to observe earthquakes up close for decades to come." Zoback is...

2005-08-03 22:12:13

PARKFIELD, Calif. (AP) -- Geologists drilling a borehole into the San Andreas Fault to better understand the physics of earthquakes have hit a seismically active section of the fault for the first time. The scientists, who began drilling in 2004, finally entered the fault zone about two miles below the surface of the Earth on Tuesday. The entire borehole will be covered with steel and cement at the end of the month so scientists can later install instruments to measure future temblors....


Word of the Day
caparison
  • A cloth or covering, more or less ornamented, laid over the saddle or furniture of a horse, especially of a sumpter-horse or horse of state.
  • Clothing, especially sumptuous clothing; equipment; outfit.
  • To cover with a caparison, as a horse.
  • To dress sumptuously; adorn with rich dress.
This word ultimately comes from the Medieval Latin 'cappa,' cloak.
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