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Last updated on April 19, 2014 at 5:20 EDT

Latest San Andreas Fault Stories

2006-04-13 17:56:28

By Jim Christie SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - San Francisco-area households are woefully unprepared for the "Big One," the catastrophic earthquake expected to strike the region one day, according to an American Red Cross survey released on Thursday. Only 6 percent of residents of the region, which suffered a magnitude 7.1 earthquake in October 1989 and is laced with major faults, have a disaster plan, a kit with basic items and some training to cope with catastrophe, according to the...

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2006-04-13 17:55:00

By Jim Christie SAN FRANCISCO -- San Francisco-area households are woefully unprepared for the "Big One," the catastrophic earthquake expected to strike the region one day, according to an American Red Cross survey released on Thursday. Only 6 percent of residents of the region, which suffered a magnitude 7.1 earthquake in October 1989 and is laced with major faults, have a disaster plan, a kit with basic items and some training to cope with catastrophe, according to the survey by American...

2006-04-12 15:10:11

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Using hand-me-down technology from the Cold War, scientists have discovered that the seafloor off the Pacific Northwest is a jumping kind of place, with thousands of small, swarming earthquakes and tectonic plates that are slowly rearranging themselves. The findings could mean that a "Big One" earthquake may not be as severe as previously thought, the lead researcher said. An article in the journal Geology by researcher Robert Dziak describes the findings. Dziak is an...

2006-03-29 13:15:55

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Scientists on Tuesday unveiled what they described as the most detailed computer simulations of the catastrophic 1906 San Francisco earthquake. The virtual models use three-dimensional geologic maps constructed by the U.S. Geological Survey last year to recreate a comprehensive portrait of how hard and how long the ground shook. "It's so incredibly exciting to see these waves sweeping across," said seismologist Mary Lou Zoback of the USGS in Menlo Park. The computer...

2006-02-10 06:31:17

LOS ANGELES -- Scientists plan to use $2 million in federal "seed money" to try to learn more about the southern San Andreas Fault, including a segment that has not ruptured in more than three centuries. The 800-mile fault, which slices through California, is best known for producing the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and subsequent fires that killed about 700 people. It is also one of the most monitored quake sites in the world. But scientists know little about the southern end of the...

2005-12-19 19:35:36

COLUMBUS, Ohio -- Ohio State University researchers using a new laser-imaging technique hope to draw new maps of the San Andreas fault that could help scientists better predict earthquakes in California. The image resolution on existing maps of the fault show post-quake earth movement of about 30 feet. The Ohio State team directed by geophysicist Mike Bevis is working with data from a light plane equipped with a new type of laser-mapping system that can show detail down to a couple of...

2005-12-06 20:20:00

By Philipp Gollner SAN FRANCISCO -- Scientists studying the San Andreas fault in California will soon be able to monitor seismic activity from deep inside the Earth's crust so they can identify patterns that might foreshadow a major quake, scientists said on Tuesday. The Stanford-U.S. Geological Survey project is the first time geologists have dug deep below the Earth's surface to within tens of meters (yards) of an active fault zone to study earthquakes, Stanford University geologist Mark...

2005-10-14 13:45:00

The San Francisco Bay region has a 25 percent chance of a magnitude 7 or greater earthquake in the next 20 years, and a roughly 1 percent chance of such an earthquake each year, according to the "Virtual California" computer simulation. The Virtual California approach to earthquake forecasting is similar to the computer models used for weather forecasting, said John Rundle, director of the UC Davis Computational Science and Engineering Center, who has developed the model with colleagues from...

2005-09-07 05:36:01

By Kevin Krolicki LOS ANGELES (Reuters) - Pick your cataclysm: A tsunami washes over Miami. A massive quake rips Los Angeles. Or the volcano under Yellowstone erupts, spewing ash across America and ushering in a new Ice Age. Surprised by Hurricane Katrina's destruction of New Orleans and the problem-plagued recovery, experts are revisiting with a new concern the risks posed by everything from killer asteroids to ocean-shaking landslides. They also are considering a haunting new...

2005-08-06 15:13:48

The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) reached a significant goal on Aug. 2 when scientists drilled into a seismically active section of the fault approximately two miles below the surface of the Earth. "This is a milestone for SAFOD," says Mark Zoback, a professor of geophysics at Stanford University. "For the first time, scientists have drilled directly into the San Andreas Fault Zone at a depth that will allow us to observe earthquakes up close for decades to come." Zoback is...