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Latest sandpipers Stories

Sandpipers Exhibit Different Feeding Behavior Depending On Position In Group
2013-10-28 11:52:55

University of Montreal The behavior of semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) feeding during low tide in the Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick, surprised Guy Beauchamp, an ornithologist and research officer at the University of Montreal's Faculty of Veterinary Medicine. While individuals on the periphery remained alert and used short pecks to feed on the mudflats, birds in the middle of the group relaxed their vigilance and fed on a different resource. The more peripheral group members were...

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2011-07-06 08:00:00

Research Bolsters Importance of Horseshoe Crab Spawning for Migrating Shorebirds Speculation that the welfare of a small, at-risk shorebird is directly tied to horseshoe crab populations is in part supported by new scientific research, according to a U.S. Geological Survey- led study published in Ecosphere, a journal of the Ecological Society of America. Population health of the red knot, a shorebird species whose population has plummeted over the last 15 years, has been directly tied to the...

2011-03-31 00:00:28

Delaware Bay will be celebrated as a "Site of Hemispheric Importance" for shorebirds at a 25-year anniversary event on May 9, 2011 in Bivalve, Port Norris, NJ. Henry M. Paulson, Jr., conservationist and 74th Secretary of the U.S. Treasury, will give the keynote address. Bivalve, Port Norris, NJ (PRWEB) March 30, 2011 On May 9, 2011, a 25-year anniversary event will celebrate the international conservation efforts for shorebirds of the Delaware Bay and the many people who have worked to...

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2009-02-18 14:29:35

Declining numbers of a shorebird called the red knot have been linked to bait use of horseshoe crabs. Long-term surveys of red knots showed that the average weight of red knots when they leave Delaware Bay has declined significantly since their primary food source, eggs of horseshoe crabs, has been reduced. The study also revealed that red knot survivorship is related to departure weight, and that the population size of red knots has declined by more than 75 percent. "We concluded that the...

2008-09-11 18:00:17

By DAN SVINGEN The weather is cooling. The kids are studying. The harvest is roaring. The shotguns are shining. These iconic images proclaim that autumn is soon upon us. For some of our fellow creatures, however, that is hardly a news flash. Incredible as it may seem, many arctic-nesting shorebirds began their "fall" migration in early July. For most such species, adult females were the first to depart the top of the world, leaving their mates to shepherd the tiny puffball chicks...

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2008-05-28 08:52:53

Experts are pointing to restrictions in U.S. east coast states on harvesting horseshoe crabs as the cause of the recent surge in the population of endangered migrating shore birds after years of over-fishing.Horseshoe crabs lay the eggs on the shores of the east coast every spring, and the migratory birds rely on the eggs as a source of food.Before the restrictions were put in place, commercial fishermen had harvested millions of crabs, which they used for bait while fishing for conch and...

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2008-02-14 11:31:08

A Conservation group is optimistic after receiving news that 84 spoon-billed sandpipers were spotted on the coast in Myanmar. The World Conservation Union states that the bird is endangered, with only 200 to 300 pairs remaining. A few months prior to the latest discovery of the bird with its distinctive spoon-like bill, Russian researchers reported a 70 percent drop in the number spotted in their normal breeding sites in Siberia also noting that none were seen this year in Bangladesh, their...

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2006-06-07 07:25:00

By Jon Hurdle REED'S BEACH, New Jersey -- On a remote New Jersey beach, a team of biologists huddled behind a dune, out of sight of a flock of birds that gathered on a stretch of sand. Suddenly, there was a loud bang, and the scientists sprinted to a spot on the beach where a net, propelled by an explosive charge, trapped about 100 birds that were flapping their wings helplessly. Rushing to untangle the birds, the team released the sea gulls and then gently placed the other species -- all...

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2006-03-31 06:58:18

GALLOWAY TOWNSHIP, N.J. -- Environmentalists won a key battle Thursday in their efforts to protect the red knot, a small bird that migrates through the Delaware Bay. After a sometimes contentious meeting that pitted the state and environmentalists against fishermen who have plied the bay for years, the state Marine Fisheries Council - by a 7-3 vote - chose not to veto proposed rules from the Department of Environmental Protection that would implement a two-year moratorium on horseshoe crab...

2005-06-07 07:11:40

TRENTON, N.J. -- Environmentalists on Tuesday will urge the governors of New Jersey and Delaware to enforce strong new protections for a migratory shorebird threatened with extinction. Eight conservation groups in the two states are rallying on behalf of the red knot, a species that migrates from South America to the Arctic to breed each spring. The birds' principal stopover is New Jersey and Delaware, where they spend weeks fattening up on horseshoe crab eggs before continuing their...


Latest sandpipers Reference Libraries

Spotted Sandpiper, Actitis macularius
2013-10-03 09:18:30

The Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius) is a shorebird of small size. It measures 18 to 20 centimeters long. In addition with its sister species, the Common Sandpiper, they make up the genus Actitis. They replace each other geographically; stray birds may settle with breeders of the other species and hybridize. Their breeding habitat is close by fresh water across most of Canada and the United States. They migrate to the southern United States and South America, and are very rare...

Great Knot, Calidris tenuirostris
2013-04-23 23:23:04

The Great Knot (Calidris tenuirostris) is a small sized wader, although, it is the largest of the calidrid species. Their breeding habitat is tundra in the northeast parts of Siberia. They nest on the ground, laying about four eggs in a ground scrape. They are strongly migratory, wintering on the coasts in southern Asia through to Australia. This species forms extremely large flocks during the winter. It’s a rare vagrant to western Europe. This bird has short dark legs and a...

Common Sandpiper, Actitis hypoleucos
2013-04-21 08:56:06

The Common Sandpiper (actitis hypoleucos) is a petite Palearctic wader. This bird and its American sister species, the Spotted Sandpiper (A. macularia), make up the genus Actitus. They are parapatric and substitute each other geographically; stray birds of either species may settle down with breeders of the other species and hybridize. Hybridization has also been reported between the Common Sandpiper and the Green Sandpiper, a basal species of the closely related shank genus Tringa. An...

The Great Knot, Calidris tenuirostris
2012-10-29 15:22:28

A long-legged wading bird, The Great Knot, is the largest of the calidrid species. They breed in the tundra of North Siberia, and migrate strongly in the winter to the coasts of Southern Asia through Australia, traveling in very large flocks. They lay about four eggs on the ground in a ground scrape. Great Knots migrate over long distances and use a limited number of staging sites during its annual round trip between the breeding grounds of Russia, and the non breeding grounds of Australia....

Spoon-billed Sandpiper, Eurynorhynchus pygmeus
2012-09-12 11:48:41

The spoon-billed sandpiper (Eurynorhynchus pygmeus) can be found in Southeast Asia in the winter and northeastern Russia during its breeding season in warmer months. In Russia, its breeding range includes the sea coats adjacent to the Chukchi Peninsula and south to the Kamchatka peninsula. It will migrate through many areas along the Pacific Coast including Japan, North and South Korea, and China to get to its main wintering range. In this area of Southeast Asia, it can be found in many areas...

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Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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