Quantcast

Latest Sarah Tishkoff Stories

Cattle Domestication Helped People Develop Tolerance To Lactose
2014-03-14 08:26:09

redOrbit Staff & Wire Reports - Your Universe Online While most people lose the ability to digest the milk sugar lactose after infancy, some populations retain high levels of an enzyme called lactase, which allows them to continue to reap the nutritive benefits of milk – and now the authors of a new study believe they have discovered the genetic origins of this particular trait. In the study, an international team of experts detail how they investigated lactase persistence in...

Bitter Taste Gene May Have Been Beneficial To Human Evolution
2013-11-12 13:31:37

Brett Smith for redOrbit.com - Your Universe Online It can be puzzling sometimes when someone else finds the taste of your favorite food to be disgusting, but research has shown we all perceive the taste of various compounds differently. A new study from researchers at the University of Pennsylvania has found a genetic mutation making certain people more sensitive to the taste of a bitter compound could have been beneficial for certain human populations in Africa, resulting in the...

2012-04-27 12:33:30

If Pygmies are known for one trait, it is their short stature: Pygmy men stand just 4'11" on average. But the reason why these groups are so short and neighboring groups are not remains unclear. Scientists have proposed various theories based on natural selection, including that Pygmies' reduced size lowered nutritional requirements, helped them better handle hot climates, or allowed them to reach sexual maturity at an earlier age. Now a new study of the Western African Pygmies in...

2011-12-07 14:27:11

Long the bane of picky eaters everywhere, broccoli´s taste is not just a matter of having a cultured palate; some people can easily taste a bitter compound in the vegetable that others have difficulty detecting. Now a team of Penn researchers has helped uncover the evolutionary history of one of the genes responsible for this trait. Beyond showing the ancient origins of the gene, the researchers discovered something unexpected: something other than taste must have driven its evolution....

2011-06-09 15:19:55

For tens of thousands of years, the genomes of malaria parasites and humans have been at war with one another. Now, University of Pennsylvania geneticists, in collaboration with an international team of scientists, have developed a new picture of one way that the human genome has fought back. The international team was led by Sarah Tishkoff, a Penn Integrates Knowledge professor with appointments in the genetics department in Penn's Perelman School of Medicine and the biology department of...

ec31c5ed0cf2c173c38397220ef0b0e81
2010-05-27 07:35:00

Genetic researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have combined data from existing archaeological and linguistic studies of Africa with human genetic data to shed light on the demographic history of the continent from which all human activity emerged. The study reveals not just a clearer picture of the continent's history but also the importance of having independent lines of evidence in the interpretation of genetic and genomic data in the reconstruction of population histories. The...

fa3d9894cb2e93885dfbacb9544e33161
2009-12-21 14:39:25

Collaboration by University of Pennsylvania and Cornell University People who identify as African-American may be as little as 1 percent West African or as much as 99 percent, just one finding of a large-scale, genome-wide study of African and African-American ancestry released today. An international research team led by scientists from the University of Pennsylvania and Cornell University has collected and analyzed genotype data from 365 African-Americans, 203 people from 12 West African...

5857dda3cce2f5b85dff67a9a61daed01
2009-04-30 14:30:00

An international team of researchers has reported the largest-ever study of genetics in Africa that helps pinpoint where human evolution began. The 10-year study combined efforts from African, American, and European researchers who studied 121 African populations, four African American populations and 60 non-African populations to uncover more than four million genotypes. Teams were looking for patterns of variation at 1327 DNA markers. They discovered that about 71 percent of the African...


Word of the Day
endocarp
  • The hard inner (usually woody) layer of the pericarp of some fruits (as peaches or plums or cherries or olives) that contains the seed.
This word comes from the Greek 'endon,' in, within, plus the Greek 'kardia,' heart.
Related