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Latest Satellite cell Stories

2012-08-07 10:19:21

The study of muscular system protein myostatin has been of great interest to researchers as a potential therapeutic target for people with muscular disorders. Although much is known about how myostatin affects muscle growth, there has been disagreement about what types of muscle cells it acts upon. New research from a team including Carnegie's Chen-Ming Fan and Christoph Lepper narrows down the field to one likely type of cell. Their work is published the week of August 6 by Proceedings of...

2012-01-03 14:06:30

We take it for granted, but the fact that our muscles grow when we work them makes them rather unique. Now, researchers have identified a key ingredient needed for that bulking up to take place. A factor produced in working muscle fibers apparently tells surrounding muscle stem cell "higher ups" that it's time to multiply and join in, according to a study in the January Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press journal. In other words, that so-called serum response factor (Srf) translates the...

2011-12-02 02:05:00

Discovery could help future treatments for muscle repairs, disorders When a muscle is damaged, dormant adult stem cells called satellite cells are signaled to “wake up” and contribute to repairing the muscle. University of Missouri researchers recently found how even distant satellite cells could help with the repair, and are now learning how the stem cells travel within the tissue. This knowledge could ultimately help doctors more effectively treat muscle disorders such as...

2011-11-21 09:50:59

An international team of researchers from Leeds, London and Berlin has discovered more about the function of muscle stem cells, thanks to next-generation DNA sequencing techniques. The work, which was co-led from the University of Leeds' School of Medicine and the Charité, Berlin, is published this week in the journal Nature Genetics. The researchers investigated several families whose children suffered from a progressive muscle disease. The children developed severe...

2011-04-18 15:08:57

Researchers have long questioned why patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) tend to manage well through childhood and adolescence, yet succumb to their disease in early adulthood, or why elderly people who lose muscle strength following bed rest find it difficult or impossible to regain. Now, researchers at the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS), part of the National Institutes of Health, are beginning to find answers in a specialized...

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2010-11-11 06:05:00

Researchers from the University of Colorado at Boulder reported Wednesday that certain types of stem cells transplanted into the leg muscles of mice prevented the loss of muscle function and mass that typically occurs with aging. The researchers injected the stem cells into the muscles of injured mice, and observed that the muscles grew back twice as large in just a few days, creating bulky mice with bulging muscles that remained strong and big for the rest of their lives. The findings could...

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2010-05-06 12:10:00

Information about how the cells move could help patients with muscular dystrophy, MU scientist says When muscle tissue experiences trauma or disease, such as muscular dystrophy, stem cells in the muscle known as "satellite cells" respond to repair and regenerate the muscle. These cells are particularly important in neuromuscular diseases, such as muscular dystrophy, which affect muscle stability and repair. Now, University of Missouri researchers have used time-lapse photography to document...

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2009-11-16 13:01:41

When muscle cells need repair, they use odor-detecting tools found in the nose to start the process, researchers have discovered. The results are published online and scheduled for publication in the November issue of the journal Developmental Cell. Found on the surfaces of neurons inside the nose, odorant receptors are molecules that bind and respond to substances wafting through the air. Researchers have shown that one particular odorant receptor gene, MOR23, is turned on in muscle cells...

2008-12-15 09:22:19

Research will be presented at American Society for Cell Biology conferenceThe first demonstration that a single adult stem cell can self-renew in a mammal was reported at the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB) 48th Annual Meeting, Dec. 13-17, 2008 in San Francisco.The transplanted adult stem cell and its differentiated descendants restored lost function to mice with hind limb muscle tissue damage.The adult stem cells used in the study, conducted at Stanford University, were isolated...

2008-06-27 15:03:00

PHILADELPHIA, June 27 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A new understanding of the role played by the protein cdk9-55 in muscle regeneration and differentiation may lead to novel therapies to rebuild muscle tissue damaged by disease, injury and aging, according to researchers at the Sbarro Institute for Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine at Temple University in Philadelphia and the University of Siena. The researchers reported their findings, "Cdk9-55: A New Player in Muscle Regeneration" in...


Word of the Day
attercop
  • A spider.
  • Figuratively, a peevish, testy, ill-natured person.
'Attercop' comes from the Old English 'atorcoppe,' where 'atter' means 'poison, venom' and‎ 'cop' means 'spider.' 'Coppa' is a derivative of 'cop,' top, summit, round head, or 'copp,' cup, vessel, which refers to 'the supposed venomous properties of spiders,' says the OED. 'Copp' is still found in the word 'cobweb.'
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